Kurdish Democratic Party


Also found in: Acronyms.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kurdish Democratic Party

 

(KDP), created in 1946. It led the struggle of the Iraqi Kurds for their national rights.

The KDP actively participated in the national liberation struggle of the peoples of Iraq against colonial domination. After the July 1958 revolution the party joined the Front of National Unity. With the war against the Kurds, which was initiated in 1961 by the Iraqi government of Kassem, the KDP and its chairman, M. Barzani, led an armed struggle of the Kurdish people.

The program of the KDP, adopted at its sixth congress (held in August 1964), demanded autonomy for the Kurds within the framework of the Iraqi Republic, the establishment of a democratic regime in Iraq, the strengthening of Arab-Kurdish brotherhood, and the consolidation of the country’s national unity. At the beginning of 1970 an agreement was reached between the Kurdish leadership and the Iraqi government regarding the peaceful regulation of the Kurdish problem in Iraq. The eighth congress of the KDP (July 1970) declared itself in favor of implementing the principles contained in the declaration of the Iraqi government of Mar. 11, 1970, on the Kurdish question and establishing firm unity between Kurds and Arabs in the struggle to reinforce the national independence of the Iraqi Republic. In 1970 five ministers from the KDP were included within the Iraqi government. The KDP publishes the newspaper At-Taakhi in Arabic.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
His maternal grandfather, Ibrahim Ahmad, was the first chairman of the ur Iraqi Kurdish political party, the Kurdish Democratic Party. Qubad's father, Jalal, the former peshmerga commander turned statesman, is the longtime head of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), and became president of Iraq in 2005.
The two main Iranian Kurdish parties, Komala and the Kurdish Democratic Party of Iran (KDPI), have been allowed to operate openly in northern Iraq; both say their focus is on political organizing within Iran.
Sophia Wanche captures the mixed emotions of fear and anticipation among the Kurds just before the March 2003 invasion, and Gareth Stansfield highlights the divisions between Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP) and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), which adversely affected the politics of free Kurdistan between 1991-2003.
Critics of the ruling parties--the PUK and the Kurdish Democratic Party, which controls western Kurdistan--say the squelching of political dissent goes too far.
The two leading Kurdish parties, the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) and the Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP), are seen by most Kurds as corrupt, as well as responsible for much of the disunity plaguing inter-Kurdish relations during the 1990s.
All this has been achieved mainly by Massoud Barzani, 59, leader of the Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP), who was a warlord when he was younger.
Talabani's elevation to president of the Iraqi republic - in return, Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP) head Masoud Barzani will be president of Kurdistan - has been the product of a deal between the two main winners of Iraq's Jan.
Meanwhile Islamic militants beheaded three Iraqi members of the Kurdish Democratic Party for co-operating with US forces.
The foreign minister will be Hoshyar Zebari, spokesman for the Kurdish Democratic Party.
Hoshyar Zebari, of the Kurdish Democratic Party, said many tribal leaders were 'still nervous - they don't believe Saddam is gone yet'.
Hoshyar Zebari, of the Kurdish Democratic Party, said it was inevitable that the US would have a major influence on the new Iraq but said his party would prefer to see an Iraqi authority set up almost immediately.
4, 1996, in a US move to punish Saddam for joining the military offensive of the Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP) to control the Kurdish north of Iraq in late August 1996.