Kurosawa


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Kurosawa

Akira . 1910--99, Japanese film director. His works include Rashomon (1950), The Seven Samurai (1954), The Throne of Blood (1957), Kagemusha (1980), Ran (1985), and Madadayo (1993)
References in periodicals archive ?
Kurosawa has an undeniably unique and authentic directorial voice.
Six years after its release, "Seven Samurai" was successfully remade in Hollywood as "The Magnificent Seven" -- the first of three Kurosawa pictures given the Hollywood Western treatment.
Rashomon, Hashimoto's first screenplay, was the beginning of his long association (spread over 20 years) with Kurosawa. This covered the two categories into which most of Japanese film history was divided: jidai-geki, period samurai films, and gendai-geki, films in a contemporary setting.
With the working title To the Ends of the Earth (Sekai No Hate Made), the screenplay, written by Kurosawa, centers on the host of a Japanese travel variety TV show who ventures with her crew to shoot a segment in Uzbekistan.
The thuggish mayor of the city Megasaki, named Kobayashi (voiced by screenwriter Kunichi Nomura and resembling longtime Kurosawa collaborator Toshiro Mifune), whips the public into a frenzy by using an outbreak of dog flu to gain power, even though the disease so far doesn't affect humans and his Science Party political opponent Professor Watanabe (Akira Ito) is on the verge of a creating a vaccine.
The ground-breaking masterpieces of filmmaker, film producer and screenwriter Akira Kurosawa (March 23, 1910 - Sept 6, 1998), have inspired such movie makers as George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Oliver Stone and Francis Ford Coppola and Kurosawa's influence can be seen in classic movies such as Star Wars, The Magnificent Seven and A Fistful of Dollars.
Here he's a hired gun in a Texas bordertown in Walter Hill's terse reworking of Kurosawa's sleek samurai classic Yojimbo.
In which artistic area was Akira Kurosawa acclaimed?
Of the many films directed by Akira Kurosawa, his twelfth feature film (1951) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Hakuchi) is perhaps the most ill fated.
Other winners included documentary 'Tir', which won the Best Film prize, Japan's Kiyoshi Kurosawa won the Best Director award for 'Seventh Code' and 'Dallas Buyers Club' also won the Audience Prize.