Kuroshio extension

Kuroshio extension

[‚ku̇·rə′shē·ō ik′sten·shən]
(oceanography)
A general term for the warm, eastward-transitional flow that connects the Kuroshio and the North Pacific currents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chlorophyll a variation in the Kuroshio Extension revealed with a mixed-layer tracking float: implication on the long-term change of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira).
Moreover, 3 major oceanic fronts exist in this region: the Polar Front, Subarctic Front, and Kuroshio Extension Front (Science Council of Japan (1)).
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific.
[1.] Aoki I, Miyashita K (2000) Dispersal of larvae and juvenile of Japanese anchovy Engraulis japonicus in the Kuroshio Extension and Kuroshio-Oyashio transition regions, western North Pacific Ocean.
Nonaka et al., "Atmospheric sounding over the winter Kuroshio Extension: effect of surface stability on atmospheric boundary layer structure," Geophysical Research Letters, vol.
The values in the Kuroshio Extension region west of 170[degrees]W around 40[degrees]N are also relatively high.
Latif believes that decade-long cycles in the midlatitudes control the position of the Kuroshio Extension, which is independent of tropical El Ninos.
Van Leeuwen, "Measuring the impact of observations on the predictability of the kuroshio extension in a shallow-water model," Journal of Physical Oceanography, vol.
This strong, warm, northward-flowing current leaves the Japanese coast to flow eastward into the North Pacific as a free jet--the Kuroshio Extension. Here, warm Kuroshio waters encounter cold, dry air masses coming from Asia, triggering intense air-sea heat exchanges that affect regional storms and climate and, indirectly, fisheries.
The recent sources of this water can be traced as far as 3 years back in time, mainly to the east of Japan along the Kuroshio Extension and the North Pacific Current (their Figure (4b)), with a smaller contribution from the western subarctic gyre region.
There are particularly large differences in regions in the North Pacific centered on 10[degrees]N and 40[degrees]N, which are relevant to intensification of the North Equatorial Current and reduction of the Kuroshio extension, as well as in some local regions around the Drake Passage and in the northern North Atlantic.