Kvass

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Kvass

 

(Russian, kvas), a refreshing drink, dating from Kievan Rus’.

Kvass is usually made from malt (rye or barley), rye flour, sugar and mint. A kvass wort is prepared and then fermented with the aid of a combined culture of kvass yeast and lactic acid bacteria. The wort is kept at 20°-25°C for six to 12 hours to complete fermenting process. The kvass is cooled to 10°-15°C and poured off, with the yeast being left in the primary vessel; the kvass is then filtered and poured into barrels and bottles. Kvass concentrates, which are easily prepared at home, are available. Other kvasses are made of fruits and berries, including apples, lemons, and cranberries.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kwass connects the story of Mandrin's short-lived reign of terror in 1754, which spawned a vast literature glorifying him and inspired political economists to develop powerful critiques of mercantilist economic regulation, to the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789, when crowds throughout the country targeted the General Farm's toll booths and offices.
Nevertheless, Kwass makes a convincing case for "globalizing" the story of the underground economy in eighteenth-century France, showing the many parallels between contraband networks in that period and those operating in the world today.
Kwass interprets Mandrin's novel gestures as representing an alternative economy, one more popular and moral.
They examine the nobility from three perspectives: the economy (Michael Kwass, Gail Bossenga, Robert M.
DAWSON, ASPEN INSTITUTE, JOBS AND THE URBAN POOR: PRIVATELY INITIATED SECTORAL STRATEGIES 4 (1995); BETH SIEGEL & PETER KWASS, JOBS AND THE URBAN POOR: PUBLICLY INITIATED SECTORAL STRATEGIES 10 (1995).
More than a half-century later, Michael Kwass has undertaken the daunting task of untangling the complex tax system that prevailed in eighteenth-century France.
In an especially interesting essay on noble display, Michael Kwass considers how conspicuous expenditure was a central part of what was expected in noble dress when the Estates-General met at Versailles in 1789.
Dies konnte auch bei dem setukesischen Volkslied mit tarenda der Fall sein, denn die Verse Naio iks targast vasta lausui:/ Esi om meil taari tarenda,/ Esi ollut kelderista,/ Modu iks musta kamberista 'Das Madchen klug antwortete: Selbst haben wir Kwass im Hause, Selbst aus dem Keller, schwarzer Met aus der Kammer' verteilen sich in anderen Liedvarianten so im Dialog zwischen Madchen und Knaben, dass an Stelle von tarenda der Inessiv tarena 'in der Stube' zusammen mit dem dazugehorigen Parallelvers kelderin 'im Keller' auftritt, dem wiederum die Elativformen erst mit den Antworten des Knaben folgen.