Kyrie eleison


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Kyrie eleison

(kĭr`ēā' əlā`ēsŏn', –sən) [Gr.,=Lord, have mercy], in the Roman Catholic Church, prayer of the MassMass,
religious service of the Roman Catholic Church, which has as its central act the performance of the sacrament of the Eucharist. It is based on the ancient Latin liturgy of the city of Rome, now used in most, but not all, Roman Catholic churches. The term Mass [Lat.
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 coming after the introit, the only ordinary part of the traditional liturgy said not in Latin but in Greek. It has nine lines: "Lord have mercy (thrice), Christ have mercy (thrice), Lord have mercy (thrice)." As the first invariable hymn, the Kyrie is often the first piece in a musical Mass. An English version is used in the Anglican liturgy and in the reformed Roman Catholic vernacular liturgy. The phrase Kyrie eleison used by itself is, of course, common in the Eastern rites, but without the phrase Christe eleison. The corresponding prayer in the Russian Orthodox church is often called a Kyrie.
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We must sing the Kyrie Eleison together, and then lace the world again.
There also is a quasi-improvisatory section in which the Kyrie eleison also figures.
("For one little apple on a tree/we get a life of misery," sings the irreplaceable Alison Jiear's Eve in one of the show's more treasurable rhymes.) Springer's warmup man (David Bedella) re-emerges as Satan, and yet "Jerry Springer--The Opera" resists giving the last word to the "prince of darkness," insisting instead on the shards of dignity appropriate to the verbal affinities between "kyrie eleison" and, yep, "Jerry Eleison."
MUSIC: Stirring hymns led by the women's choir, prayers set to Celtic folk tunes, and the Greek hymn Kyrie Eleison. The liturgy has been fine- tuned to an art form.
She had the text of the Kyrie eleison; we had to listen to the way that composers from Monteverdi to Stravinsky had set it.
For example, in his essay on the Roman liturgy at the turn of the fifth century, he discusses the origins of the Kyrie eleison (pp.
Each of the three parts of Elizabethan Mythologies comprises three chapters, giving the reader a ready-made structure (like that of the liturgical petition Kyrie eleison) to which there is an introduction and coda.
Although the parts of these masses do not appear in sequence in the narrative, many of them can still be identified within various episodes: the Introit at the beginning of "Telemachus," the Kyrie Eleison in "Aeolus," the Epistle in Deasy's letter in "Nestor," the Lavabo when Bloom bathes in "Lotos-Eaters," and so on.
Thus, 'Kyrie eleison', 'Quam olim Abrahae promisisti' are sung almost as separate words, and lack rhetorical and expressive shape.
If he'd found a place anywhere other than in front of my row, he'd have two painful musical hours (Kyrie eleison) in which to observe the fact that seat four in row C remained incriminatingly vacant.