lawn

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Related to LAWNS: Lawn care

lawn,

grass turf or greensward cultivated in private yard or public park. A good lawn, or green, has both beauty and usefulness; its maintenance for golf, tennis, baseball, and other sports is a costly and specialized procedure. It requires good soil, frequent watering and mowing, and occasional rolling and fertilizing. Weed pests, such as dandelions and crabgrass, are eliminated by root removal or by sprayingspraying,
horticultural practice of applying fungicides, insecticides, and herbicides, usually in solution, to plants. It may be accomplished by various means, e.g., the watering can, sprinkler attachment, spray gun, aerosol bomb, power spraying machine, or airplane.
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. Most lawn plants are types of cloverclover,
any plant of the genus Trifolium, leguminous hay and forage plants of the family Leguminosae (pulse family). Most of the species are native to north temperate or subtropical regions, and all the American cultivated forms have been introduced from Europe.
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 and, especially, of grassgrass,
any plant of the family Poaceae (formerly Gramineae), an important and widely distributed group of vascular plants, having an extraordinary range of adaptation. Numbering approximately 600 genera and 9,000 species, the grasses form the climax vegetation (see ecology) in
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. Bluegrass, white clover, and a few types of fescue and bent grass are most often selected for temperate climates in the United States. Bermuda grass, rye grass, St. Augustine grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum), and carpet grass (Axonopus affinus) are planted in warmer regions.

Bibliography

See U.S. Dept. of Agriculture bulletins; J. U. Crochett, Lawns and Ground Covers (1971).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lawn

 

a piece of land covered with grass that is kept mowed and trimmed evenly. There are parterre, park, sport, and moresque (motley colored) lawns.

Lawns are a basic element of flower gardens and parterres and serve as a background for flower beds and decorative trees as well as for sculptures and fountains. Park and moresque lawns are arranged in parks, gardens, public gardens, and boulevards. Grass seed is sown primarily in the spring by hand or by seeding machines that are driven in perpendicular directions. Then the lawn is raked manually or mechanically and rolled. The combination of grasses for lawns is chosen to create thick herbage and a dense turf. The cereals, such as meadow grass, fescue, ryegrass, and bent, are sown 15-30 g of seeds per sq m. Moresque lawns combine a mixture of cereals and annuals with beautiful blossoms, such as the poppy, cornflower, calendula, and candytuft. Lawn care includes watering, fertilizing, mowing, weeding, and additional sowing.

REFERENCES

Saakov, S. G. Gazony i tsvetochnoe oformlenie. Moscow-Leningrad, 1954.
Mal’Ko, I. M. Sadovo-parkovoe stroitel’stvo i khoziaistvo, 3rd ed.Moscow, 1962.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lawn

[lȯn]
(textiles)
A sheer cotton or cotton and polyester fabric made of combed or carded yarn.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lawn

1. An open space of ground of some size, covered with grass and kept smoothly mown.
2. Same as gauze, 2.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lawn

1
1. a flat and usually level area of mown and cultivated grass
2. an archaic or dialect word for glade

lawn

2
a fine linen or cotton fabric, used for clothing
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

LAWN

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

LAWN

(Local Area Wireless Network) An earlier acronym for a WLAN. See wireless LAN.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in classic literature ?
Strolling toward them from the tent Beaufort advanced over the lawn, tall, heavy, too tightly buttoned into a London frock-coat, with one of his own orchids in its buttonhole.
Ellen--ELLEN!" she cried in her shrill old voice, trying to bend forward far enough to catch a glimpse of the lawn beyond the verandah.
`When I reached the lawn my worst fears were realized.
I made a careful examination of the ground about the little lawn. I wasted some time in futile questionings, conveyed, as well as I was able, to such of the little people as came by.
He was absent-minded, but he stopped to pat a little dog whose attentions he usually ignored, and he picked a creamy-white rose as he crossed the lawn and wondered why it should remind him of her.
SUMMER is the time when your lawn gets a hammering - from kids, garden party guests and pets.
69 percent of Americans who have a lawn say their lawns could be improved.
Circular lawns work very well in small spaces or irregular-shaped gardens as they take your eye away from awkward features and hold your attention better.
Good drainage and oxygenation are important for lawns. A little care, <Bespecially at this time of year, will pay dividends
This is especially true in Florida, with year-round warmth and acres of verdant golf courses and lush lawns.
Equally, by ignoring your lawn, you risk ugly bare patches next year.