LED

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LED,

light-emitting diode. See diodediode
, two-terminal electronic device that permits current flow predominantly in only one direction. Most diodes are semiconductor devices; diode electron tubes are now used only for a few specialized applications.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Led’

 

a river in Arkhangel’sk Oblast, RSFSR, a left tributary of the Vaga (Severnaia Dvina basin). Length, 184 km; basin area, 2,690 sq km. It originates from a lake, Letozero, and is very meandering. The Led’ is fed primarily by snow. The mean flow rate 42 km from the mouth is 16.7 cu m per sec. The Led’ freezes in late October or in November, thawing in late April or May. It is used for floating timber. Fish are abundant.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

LED

(electronics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

light-emitting diode

A solid-state device (diode) that emits light of a single primary color, but in combination with other diodes can produce colors of any hue for use in signage. These devices, each of which is about one centimeter (half-inch), have a remarkably long life. Also called an LED.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

LED

(electronics)
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

LED

(Light Emitting Diode) A display and lighting technology used in almost every electrical and electronic product on the market, from a tiny on/off light to digital readouts, flashlights, traffic lights and perimeter lighting. LEDs are also used as the light source in multimode fibers, optical mice and laser-class printers. See LED bulb.

LEDs vs. LCDs
In the early 1970s, red LEDs were used in the first digital watches, but were superseded by lower-power LCDs within a few years. LEDs still use more power than LCDs, but less power than incandescent bulbs. They also last for decades and are virtually indestructible.

LEDs and LCDs coexist on countless devices where the LEDs provide the status lights, and the LCDs display data. In addition, white or red, green and blue LEDs are used as the backlight source on many LCD TV sets. See LCD, LED TV and flat panel TV.

Several Colors
LEDs are semiconductor diodes that typically emit a single wavelength of light when charged with electricity. Originally red, today, several colors can be generated based on the material used for the tips of the probes. Aluminum indium gallium phosphide (AlInGaP) is used for red and yellow. Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) is used for green and blue, and with the addition of phosphor, for white light as well. See digital billboard, OLED, IRED, LED printer, fiber optics glossary and Nixie tube.


An LED Unit
The LED is the semiconductor die, which sits in a reflective cup that is also a heat sink. Voltage is applied to the LED, and electrons and holes in the two semiconductor layers are attracted to each other at the junction. When they combine, photons are created.







LEDs and LCDs Are Used Together
Small alphanumeric readouts can be LED or LCD, but the indicator lights on countless products are LEDs.







First LED Watch
The Synchronar 2100 was the first LED watch and the first solar powered watch. It preceded Hamilton's famous Pulsar LED watch in 1970. (Image courtesy of the private collection of Peter Wenzig.)







LEDs Offer Flexibility
A flick of a switch changes the ambience in this Los Angeles bedroom (top), while the Westin Hotel staircase in Shanghai (bottom) cycles colors or becomes a musical light show. (Images courtesy of Color Kinetics, Inc., Bedroom design and photo by Steven Cordrey. Staircase by Light Directions Hong Kong, photo by Friendly Light.)


LEDs Offer Flexibility
A flick of a switch changes the ambience in this Los Angeles bedroom (top), while the Westin Hotel staircase in Shanghai (bottom) cycles colors or becomes a musical light show. (Images courtesy of Color Kinetics, Inc., Bedroom design and photo by Steven Cordrey. Staircase by Light Directions Hong Kong, photo by Friendly Light.)
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apply this test: Would you turn your head to see the sight you're describing in the anecdotal lede? Would you cross the street to see it?
In short, it is a lede that would provide me no material at the breakfast table.
How does the vendor handle the few law firms that may not be able to provide LEDES output?
For further details regarding LEDES visit www.ledes.org.
The spectacle of these two old pros flaunting their oppositional thesping styles, combined with helmer Richard Ledes' stylishly empty twists on neo-noir, may snag pic a limited run.
Helmer and co-scripter Ledes clearly enjoys Gould and Langella's benignly paranoid interactions.
Harold Ashton Bill Raymond Dan Wendell Pierce Betty Merritt Wever Like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," debuting writer-director Richard Ledes' "A Hole in One" is an offbeat romantic drama about cranial housecleaning, this time as part of the 1950s psychiatric health care explosion that led to lobotomies as treatment for everything from anxiety to insomnia.
Stitched around the concept that craziness is a relative state of mind, Ledes' ambitious script attempts to take too many ideas onboard--about radical thought, misguided medical advances, anticommunist hysteria, '50s naivete, media manipulation, Hiroshima and Ethel Rosenberg's execution--making the film as thematically overburdened as it is laden with gratuitous stylistic flourishes.
For a journalist, it is imperative to get the audience's - and the editor's - attention with the lead (or lede as it's often called, to distinguish it from a police clue or something that comes out of a pencil).
A pagination system, for example, could be told to pull the lede and nut graf from the Sunday Starr/Lewinsky/Clinton roundup for the last 1,473 weeks, and use them to construct a timeline to accompany today's A1 story.