listening

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listening

Checking for matching data. In computer operations, the act of comparing is sometimes called listening. See TCP/IP port.
References in periodicals archive ?
ListenWiFi, Listen Technologies' pro audio streaming solution will become Audio Everywhere from Listen Technologies, offering a plug and play, low-latency solution for assistive listening that can operate on a venue's existing wireless network.
The cycle includes a short prelistening planning/predicting stage; three listening verification stages where students listen to the passage, verify their understanding, select and use listening strategies to address their comprehension problems, and evaluate their strategy use; and finally a reflection stage where students write about or discuss what they have learned about their strategic listening processes, and then set goals for improving their strategy use in future listening tasks.
More specifically, in her discourses, I argue that Dworkin urges audiences to: acknowledge the complexities of listening to painful experiences while performing listening with forbearance and rigor; view listening as sacred and to enact listening with no expectation of personal gain; recognize that failing to listen enables oppressive structures to reproduce; listen to those who have "no claim" to speak; and recognize that personal stories have the potential to provide concrete knowledge that may serve as the basis of challenging social structures and motivating collective action.
When they do converse, they expect their physician leaders to listen with "clinical ears" and to view things through the same "clinical lens" as they do.
As someone said so beautifully, it is not for nothing that we have two ears but only one mouth in order that we listen more and speak less.
The wildly different nature of these activities and the skills involved in them mean that one can easily be listening, and yet simultaneously fail to listen.
Unable to hear, he could not listen to Jesus; unable to listen, he could not speak.
Improving this process is crucial yet individuals are often unaware of their listening habits, let alone of the impact of the way they listen on workplace interactions.
This midrash describes four types of listeners: one who listens and loses; one who listens and is rewarded by God; one who does not listen and is rewarded by God; and one who does not listen and loses.
Nevertheless, listening gained a new importance in language classrooms in the 1980s, largely as a result of Krashen's (1982) claims on second language acquisition through comprehensible input and Asher's (1988) methodological innovations, which were based on the belief that students are likely to benefit from a "silent period" if not forced to produce the target language for some time and just listen to it.
Communication is the most important skill in life, says Covey, and while we spend years learning how to read and write, and years learning how to speak, what training do we get that enables us to listen so that we truly understand another human being?