LSB galaxies

LSB galaxies

Short for low surface brightness galaxies. Galaxies with a very low central surface brightness that may be very common and contain much of the mass in the Universe. They are difficult to detect against the brightness of the night sky and are thus missing from most galaxy catalogs. They are thought to be unevolved systems, with central regions resembling a dwarf galaxy. Most of the mass is contained in a large gaseous disk that is observable only at radio wavelengths or with image-enhanced exposures. The galaxies are thus commonly referred to as icebergs. See Malin 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
LSB Galaxies. The surface brightness of LSB galaxies is substantially fainter than the brightness of the sky at night.
Most of the LSB galaxies that were observed are dwarf galaxies; however there is also a significant number of large spirals among LSB galaxies [88].
We confronted the BEC model with 6 LSB galaxies chosen from a larger sample [38].
It was previously known that for LSB galaxies and without including the baryonic sector, the BEC model gave a better fit than the NFW model [62].
The unsatisfactory large distance behaviour of the BEC model for both the HSB and LSB galaxies of type II originates in the sharp cutoff of the BEC DM distribution and clearly indicates that it would be desirable to modify the BEC model on larger scale, also to comply with the behaviour of the universal rotation curves (URCs) at larger radii [94].
There were no dynamical data for LSB galaxies at the time when MOND was suggested, so this was a prediction of MOND (Scarpa 2006).
For LSB galaxies, [SIGMA] << [[SIGMA].sub.0], the internal accelerations are small and a large mass discrepancy is expected.
The importance of MONDian effects differs for HSB and LSB galaxies and depends on the average surface brightness of the galaxy.
LSB galaxies are very diffuse and hard to detect against the "noise" of the night-sky background, even when observed from a site with little artificial light pollution (S&T: April 1998, page 28).
Although usually quite small, LSB galaxies exhibit the whole range of galactic forms.
In addition to the small LSB galaxies, researchers have detected three dim giants, the latest being 1226 + 0105 in Virgo.
They found that more than half had evolved from dwarf LSB galaxies and may return to that quiet state relatively soon, perhaps a billion years after their brief flurry of star formation ends.