LTE architecture


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LTE architecture

The infrastructure of an LTE cellular network comprises the E-UTRA/E-UTRAN air interface and the Evolved Packet Core (EPC), which includes the gateways, mobility management and subscriber databases. The air interface and packet core enable the LTE mobile user to connect to external data networks such as the Internet. In contrast to 2G and 3G networks, which separates voice and data networks, all media are transmitted as IP packets in an LTE network.

The LTE base station (Evolved Node B) connects to the EPC via the Serving Gateway (S-GW), and the EPC connects to the packet network via the Packet Data Network Gateway (PDN-GW). The Mobility Management Entity (MME) tracks the user's movement, while the Home Subscriber Server (HSS) database provides subscriber information similar to the Home Location Register (HLR) in 3G/UMTS networks. Contrast with 2G/3G architecture. See E-UTRAN, LTE and cellular generations.


LTE Equipment
All types of media flow into and out of an LTE network as IP packets. There is no circuit-switched component as in 2G/3G systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through analyzing existing LTE architecture, one can find several proposals focusing on SDN for changing the current cellular network.
Chourasia and Sivalingam in [22] revealed a possible solution for using SDN to replace existing LTE architecture. In this architecture, they proposed the use of a centralized controller that has a global view of the whole network, which makes the resources management easier.
Section 2 provides background information on the LTE architecture, the state of the art in LTE sharing infrastructures, and our previously proposed LTE sharing architecture.
Figure 1 shows an overview of the LTE architecture and its basic components.
It will enable RRHs to share BBUs and telcos to share infrastructures to improve the efficiency in the usage of resources of the LTE architecture.
Following a decentralized LTE architecture, the anchor points (S/PGW) are placed closer to the edge network to locally handle the MNs' traffic and mobility, and the MNs are expected to change their anchor point far more often.
Caption: FIGURE 2: Current LTE architecture and its two mobility management protocols for 3GPP access.
CommsMEA: How is this increasingly diverse range of plans helping operators to generate a solid ROI from their LTE architectures?