device

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device

1. a machine or tool used for a specific task; contrivance
2. any ornamental pattern or picture, as in embroidery
3. computer hardware that is designed for a specific function
4. a particular pattern of words, figures of speech, etc., used in literature to produce an effect on the reader
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

device

[di′vīs]
(computer science)
A general-purpose term used, often indiscriminately, to refer to a computer component or the computer itself.
(electronics)
An electronic element that cannot be divided without destroying its stated function; commonly applied to active elements such as transistors and transducers.
(engineering)
A mechanism, tool, or other piece of equipment designed for specific uses.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

device

In an electric system, a component that is intended to carry, but not consume, electric energy, e.g., a switch.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

device

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

device

(1) Hardware. The term refers to any electronic or electromechanical machine or component from a transistor to a disk drive to a smartphone. A device always refers to hardware, never to software. However, a "device driver" refers to software written to activate (to drive) a specific hardware device (see driver).

A User or Client Device
In general conversation, "the user's device" refers to the hardware operated by a person and may refer to a smartphone, tablet, iPod, laptop or desktop computer, but not to devices in a network (see network device).

(2) In semiconductor design, a device is an active component, such as a transistor or diode, in contrast to a passive component, such as a resistor or capacitor.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
FDA agreed on a confirmatory Phase 3 trial of Revascor in LVAD patients, with a primary endpoint of reduction in major mucosal bleeding events, and key secondary endpoints demonstrating improvement in various parameters of cardiovascular function.
Apart from this, LVAD is also an option for heart failure patients who are at the other end of the spectrum who are not suitable for a heart transplant due to very high pulmonary artery pressures, as this patient.
'LVAD implants would continue in the days to come and we are going to perform another LVAD transplant in a couple of days at NICVD.
The study will also examine the ability of LVAD patients to wean from the LVAD device, their quality of life, and their overall daily activity.
The only alternative was a LVAD, which is a form of electric pump."
However, two years after receiving the LVAD, Jim underwent another lifesaving operation after the pump malfunctioned.
THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients receiving left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy and their caregivers, patient and caregiver characteristics predict response, according to a study published online March 7 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
11 installed the pump, known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for Ken Ritchey of LaVale, MD.
Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) currently establishes a place in the treatment of end-stage heart failure as bridging therapy for patients awaiting heart transplantation or as destination therapy.
Compared to medical therapy, the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been shown to prolong survival in patients with advanced heart failure who are awaiting or are not candidates for transplant [1].
Two types of cardiac therapy devices are commonly used to treat patients with cardiac disease: cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and left ventricular assist device (LVAD).