La Belle Dame Sans Merci

La Belle Dame Sans Merci

cruel and heartless lady. [Br. Lit.: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” in Walsh Modern, 51]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agnes," the lovers rushing away into the night; then "La Belle Dame Sans Merci," the lover seduced and abandoned.
The final chapter connects "language strange," the tone, rhythm, and nonsense syllables of mothers' talk to their infants, with the "sinister," seductive voice of the female in Romantic poetry such as Lamia (1884), "Christabel," (1797, 1800), and "La Belle Dame sans Merci" (1819) (128).
But Christopher Durang and his multiple co-scribes have to answer for the lame idea of teaming up La Belle Dame Sans Merci with the cafe singer and musical jack-of-all-trades, Michael Feinstein.
had stolen, well, perhaps not her heart but her ambition, commentators have portrayed Peter McKay as victim of la belle dame sans merci. It hardly seems fair.
In 1920, at the height of the film Avant-Garde movement, its only female member Germaine Dulac released her tenth film La Belle Dame sans merci, which she wrote in collaboration (1) with her friend Irene Hillel-Erlanger, a surrealist poet also known as Claude Lorey.
She already had her own coffin - in a gothic style and features her favourite poem, La Belle Dame Sans Merci by Keats, down the centre.
Critics have identified a considerable array of possible sources for Keats's La Belle Dame sans Merci including, but not limited to, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, and Canto 5 of Dante's Inferno.
The knowledge that Orfeo finally has been away for seven years searching for the dead girl, when he himself believes his span in the Underworld to have been only a day, links this haunted story with Keats' La Belle Dame Sans Merci, where a bewitchedknig ht ages in a deserted landscape.
Agnes' and 'La Belle Dame sans Merci' present the Gothic as not merely a harbinger but an inhabitant of the Romantic lyric.
Agnes" he also developed more fully the figure of the alluring and dangerous woman in the characters La Belle Dame sans Merci and Lamia, both of whom threaten, as Madeline does, to draw the male out of the real world into a realm of magic and imagination.
It is 'figured' in the debates of the Titans in the first 'Hyperion' and the poet's dialogue with Moneta in the second (where the death/life allusion is related to the new social preoccupations recognized in Dr Bennett's analysis of this poem); in the interrogations which characterize the odes in general and the questionings in particular of the Grecian Urn; in the questions even of 'La Belle Dame Sans Merci'.