Occupational Safety and Health Administration

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Occupational Safety and Health Administration

(OSHA), U.S. agency established (1970) in the Dept. of Labor (see Labor, United States Department ofLabor, United States Department of,
federal executive department established in 1913 and charged with administering and enforcing statutes that promote the welfare of U.S. wage earners, improve their working conditions, and advance their opportunities for profitable employment.
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) to develop and enforce regulations for the safety and health of workers in businesses that are engaged in interstate commerce. OSHA develops guidelines and issues regulations for safety and health standards, and conducts inspections of workplaces for compliance with these standards. In instances of noncompliance, it issues citations and proposes penalties. In the 1980s and 90s, OSHA took a more active role in protecting against health hazards in the workplace, seeking to limit the exposure of workers to hazardous substances such as lead, asbestos, pesticides, and toxic chemicals and noise.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

(OSHA)
A branch of the U.S. Department of Labor responsible for establishing and enforcing safety and health standards in the workplace.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

An organization within the US Department of Labor, whose responsibilities include safety in the workplace; publishes standards in the US Code of Federal Regulations that govern safety in buildings during construction and during occupancy. These regulations may be obtained directly from OSHA: Occupational Safety and Health Administration, US Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Labor Department says its analysis shows 5 percent of private sector workers nationally fall within the overtime eligibility threshold.
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One option, said Joshua Waldbeser, an associate at the law firm Drinker Biddle & Reath who also participated in the webinar, is a new proposal from the Labor Department, followed by a request for public comment, or an interim final rule, which would take effect immediately but be subject to comment afterward.
The increased complexity of the retirement-plan market compelled the Labor Department, they argued, to revisit the 40-year-old regulatory framework for retirement advice.
The Labor Department believes the request for a hearing is premature, EBSA officials say.
Programs will build upon the Labor Department's Disability Program Navigator Initiative and other model service-delivery strategies.
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In a news release, the Labor Department's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs said its investigators had determined that Baldor's applicant screening process created "a disparate impact on women and minorities."
In our new investigation "Waiting in vain," reporter Maria Ines Zamudio points out the flaws in the Labor Department's methods of keeping businesses accountable.