clinical pathology

(redirected from Laboratory medicine)
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clinical pathology

[′klin·ə·kəl pə′thäl·ə·jē]
(pathology)
A medical specialty encompassing the diagnostic study of disease by means of laboratory tests of material from the living patient.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants in the Summit began a conversation in the hope that, by outlining a strategic blueprint now, laboratory medicine will be better positioned to face tomorrow's challenges.
Researchers in such fields as pathology, toxicology, and forensic medicine set out general principles of quality assurance of pathology and laboratory medicine. They consider quality assurance in quantifiable methods applied in the laboratory, in the emerging disciplines of personalized therapy and virtopsy, and in professional education at the graduate and post-graduate levels.
The second half of the book consists of 32 chapters on trauma, toxicology, environmental injuries, laboratory medicine, airway management, and wound care.
Elsayed is an associate medical microbiologist at Calgary Laboratory Services and an assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and microbiology and infectious diseases at the University of Calgary.
This month, January 2016, we celebrate the 90th anniversary of the ARCHIVES of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine. First published in January 1926 as a specialty journal of the American Medical Association, the ARCHIVES is one of the oldest continuously published pathology journals in the United States.
Clinical laboratories provide valuable services to aid patient diagnosis and management, but systematic evidence of laboratory medicine's specific contribution to the overall process of healthcare is difficult to find.
Professor of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine;
Address for correspondence: Po-Ren Hsueh, Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, No.
For instance, fewer clinical laboratory physicians and scientists are publishing in top journals such as Clinical Chemistry, where currently only approximately 35% of original reports have a first or last author associated with a laboratory medicine or pathology department.

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