Labridae


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Labridae

[′lab·rə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The wrasses, a family of perciform fishes in the suborder Percoidei.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Labridae

 

Wrasses, a family of fish of the order Percomor-phi.

The coloring in abridae, especially in the males, is vivid (bright red, light blue, purple, or orange stripes and spots on a yellowish or green background) and changes according to conditions. The body length in the majority of the family’s species is 10–30 cm and the weight, approximately 250 g; some species (for example, Cheilinus undulatus) are as long as 1.8 m and weigh as much as 27 kg. About 50 genera are known (embracing 400 species), found near the shores of all tropical and subtropical seas, but a few species can be found along the European shores of the Atlantic as far as Norway and along the American shores as far as Cape Cod. Labridae are characteristic fauna of coral reefs. Their biology of reproduction is quite varied; some deposit their roe in nests of algae and guard it. The majority feed on benthos (mainly mollusks), but there are also herbivorous species. They are not of great commercial significance. In the Black and Azov seas of the USSR there are eight species, of the genera La-brus, Crenilabrus, Ctenolabrus, Symphodus, and Coris; the most common is the green wrasse Crenilabrus tinea.

A. A. SVETOVIDOVA

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spearguns are also used mainly to catch various reef-fishes such as, snappers (Lutjanidae), hogfishes (Labridae), and triggerfishes (Balistidae), but sometimes they are unlawfully used to harvest lobsters.
An annotated checklist of the species of the Labroid fish families Labridae and Scaridae.
Gorlick, "Ingestion of host fish surface mucus by the Hawaiian cleaning wrasse, Labroides phthirophagus (Labridae), and its effect on host species preference," Copeia, vol.
Four families (Sparidae, Labridae, Monacanthidae and Platycephalidae) occur widely across Sydney coastal sites (Figure 3, Table 1) and are relatively abundant (by percentage of NISP [number of individual specimens]) at Quadrant, Angophora Reserve, Mount Trefle and Balmoral Beach (Table 2).
Although Jordan only has a coastline of 15 miles at the north end of the Red Sea, it offers fantastic coral reefs, colourful marine life as well as turtles and Napoleon wrasse, the largest living member of the family Labridae, with males reaching lengths of 2 metres.
Regarding distribution of the sampled eggs per family, Engraulidae (89%) family is the dominant family and is followed by Clupeidae (8%), Labridae (1%) followed by other families which are less than 1% (Gadidae, Serranidae, Carangidae, Sparidae, Callionymidae, Mugilidae, Bothidae and Soleidae) (Fig.
cylindracea on prey availability: an experimental approach to predation of amphipods by Thalassoma pavo (Labridae).
Cirrhilabrus brunneus, a new wrasse (Pisces: Labridae) from northeastern Kalimantan, Indonesia.
Dualistic spawning behaviour of the cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus (Pisces: Labridae), in Bonne Bay, Newfoundland.
A classic example of mutualism is the cleaning behavior of some Labridae (wrasses) such as the cleaner fish (Labroides dimidiatus), which feeds on ectoparasites.