Lacan

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Lacan

Jacques . 1901--81, French psychoanalyst, who reinterpreted Freud in terms of structural linguistics: an important influence on poststructuralist thought
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In order to explain why Creon and Antigone are bad examples of a pursuit for happiness, I give an introductory account of the Lacanian concept of desire, which is central for his concept of happiness.
Desire is a central concept in Lacan's work and this centrality is also expressed through the Lacanian ethical injunction "Do not cede on your desire." At first sight, Lacan would seem to follow Aristotle insofar as happiness is related to the satisfaction of the desire of a sovereign good (1986, 13), not just to an effect of having fun or pleasure.
While Freud and Lacan most often simply omit substantive discussions of race, many contemporary Lacanians have explicitly argued the primacy of sexual difference.
Moreover, while Tuhkanen's psychoanalytic edifice is thoroughly Lacanian, his cultural criticism extends beyond Wright's most famous novels to intertextual readings with Wright's lesser-known works, slave narratives and spirituals, blackface and minstrelsy, and other canonical African-American authors (e.g., Du Bois, Washington, Douglass, Baldwin), while his theoretical framework also engages critical race theory, postcolonial theory, queer theory, literary theory and philosophy.
Lacanian Psychotherapy: Theory and Practical Applications, by Michael J.
Effectively parrying some of most pointed attacks, Tuhkanen argues that a more nuanced and frankly more accurate understanding of Lacanian theory obviates many of the most egregious complaints leveled against psychoanalysis.
Some background in Lacanian psychoanalytic theory is a prerequisite for making sense of Ettinger's text.
Without summarizing the essays to come, it is worth providing a brief sketch of what a Lacanian-classical research program might offer to Lacanians and classicists alike.
."Lacan and the New Lacanians: Josephine Hart's Damage, Lacanian Tragedy, and the Ethics of Jouissance." PMLA 113 (1998): 395-407.
There they try to make the big Other exist, perhaps in the form of natural balance--but it's always the big Other, precisely in the Lacanian sense of the eternal order that always returns to itself and that we must rejoin.
And yet, while theory was useful to the renewal of the discipline of English in this respect, what the institution of Lacanian psychoanalysis had, and has, to offer the academy was missed.
This paradox in his criticism displays in miniature the boundary of naturalism with modernism, the boundary that Jackson explores through the lens of Lacanian theory.