Laconian


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Laconian

inhabitant of ancient country of Laconia; people noted for pauciloquy. [Gr. Hist.: NCE, 1514]
References in periodicals archive ?
Laconian key and then sweep 46' west-northwest to the double star
The Spartans own most of the Laconian land while the helots own none.
Laconian Iconography of the Sixth Century B.C., Oxford.
Those Laconians who were neither helots nor Spartans lived in communities of "dwellers around," bound to Sparta by treaties so that they could organize no action on their own.
The Laconian Leonidas, who performed a like exploit at Thermopylae, because of his valour won unexampled glory and gratitude from all Greece, and was honoured with memorials of the highest distinction; they showed their appreciation of that deed of his by pictures, statues and honourary inscriptions, in their histories, and in other ways; but the tribune of the soldiers, who had done the same thing and saved an army, gained small glory for his deeds.
"Cult and Allegory: The Life Story of Artemidoros of Perge," in [PHI]l[lambda]O[lambda][alpha][kappa][omega]v: Laconian Studies in Honour of Hector Catling, ed.
This exotic geography of color continues through the description with scarlet defined as "Median" and purple as "Phoenician" (1.28.4)--a leitmotif that merges into the ethnic epithets of the hunting dogs as "Locrian, Laconian, Indian, and Cretan" (at 1.28.5).
as a victor in the rich fields of Pylades, the host of Laconian Orestes, whom, indeed, at the slaughter of his father...
(117) That the more important of the two slaves in the early part of Knights is meant (at least intermittently) to represent Demosthenes is proved by 54-7 where this slave claims to have `kneaded a Laconian barley-cake at Pylos' which Paphlagon-Kleon stole and served up to the Demos as if he had made it.
There would appear to be at least one Laconian reference here.
The Messenian helots probably worked principally as agricultural laborers, while their Laconian counterparts, dwelling in closer proximity to their masters, could serve in other, more direct fashions, such as personal servants or as military support.
The focus will be on the preface to book three of the Periegesis, the Laconian History (3.1.1.-3.10.5), and more specifically the account contained therein of the late fifth and fourth century.