Lactobacillus

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Lactobacillus

[¦lak·tō·bə′sil·əs]
(microbiology)
Lactic acid bacteria, the single genus of the family Lactobacillaceae; found in dairy products, meat products, fruits, beer, wine, and other food products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pork jerky, Fermentation, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Angel Yeast.
The results of the present study verified that the simultaneous ingestion of probiotics Bifidobacterium breve, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus acidophilus at a concentration of [10.sup.7] CFU/mL was able to effectively reduce brain damage by 52%, compared with the control group.
([dagger]) Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Streptococcus hermophiles.
Some researchers have reported a decrease in the concentration of lactic acid and acetic acid in low fat yogurt containing both starters of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thennophilus in the presence of inulin [30],
Make sure your yogurt's label says it contains "live and active cultures" (the ingredients will list specific strains, such as Lactobacillus bulgaricus or L.
Hashemiyeh, "Effect of different media on production of lactic acid from whey by Lactobacillus bulgaricus," African Journal of Biotechnology, vol.
While helpful to consumers, the seal is limited in that it does not differentiate from added probiotics--those beneficial bacteria that populate our intestinal tract and have been linked to specific benefits, such as improved digestion and immunity--and the starter culture bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophiles) used in the fermentation process for producing yogurt.
Five papers from the Shaanxi University of Science and Technology manipulate the enzyme activity of ?-galactosidase immobilized in chitosan beads, add protective agents while freeze drying Lactobacillus bulgaricus powder, and measure the effectiveness of Tween emulsifiers added to phytosterol and milk.
He further contributed to the adoption of the name of the species, lactobacillus bulgaricus, one of the two essential yoghurt starter microorganisms.
The Nobel laureate Elie Metchnikoff was the first microbiologist in the beginning of the 20th century who suggested that the longevity of Bulgarian peasants could be related to their large consumption of sour milk containing Lactobacillus bulgaricus. The most commonly used definition for probiotics comes from Fuller in 1989 defining that "probiotics are live microbial food supplements, which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance" [1].
Yogurt is produced by fermenting milk with bacterial starter cultures Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.