Ladder


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ladder

[′lad·ər]
(engineering)
A structure, often portable, for climbing up and down; consists of two parallel sides joined by a series of crosspieces that serve as footrests.

Ladder

A wooden object consisting of two side pieces connected to each other at regular intervals by rungs; used for climbing up or down during construction, or used as a temporary stair.

ladder

A frame, usually of wood or metal, consisting of two side pieces (called “stiles”) which are connected by crosspieces, usually round (called “rungs”); used as a means of climbing up or down.

ladder

walking under one can bring only misfortune. [Western Folklore: Leach, 598]

ladder

stood upon by Joseph to remove nails holding Christ to the cross. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 55]

Ladder

(dreams)
Ascension or descension on a ladder may be an unconscious reflection of your movement toward a goal. Ascending is generally a more positive symbol than descending. The ladder is suggestive of hard work and exertion of energy. The ladder may also be symbolic of the “way to heaven.” You can decide whether the heaven is here on earth or in the forever after! Missing rungs may symbolize missing elements or hardships and handicaps that you could be (or are) encountering on your ascent to better and bigger things.
References in classic literature ?
"'Do you know that he has slept in the upper room of the donjon ever since it was restored?' And with the same gesture he pointed to the half-open door, the ladder, the terrace, and the windows in the
(I say, if, because at this moment, apart from the presence of the ladder and his vacant room, there are no evidences which permit me even to suspect him)--if he is there, he has been obliged to pass by the ladder, and the rooms which lie behind his, in his new lodging, are occupied by the family of the steward and by the cook, and by the kitchens, which bar the way by the vestibule to the interior of the chateau.
Boxtel put a lighted dark lantern into his pocket, mounted the ladder, and slipped into the dry-room.
It was reached only by a ladder, and it seemed to be as bare as the bare walls.
"I am looking for the person who let down the ladder. I see no one and yet the ladder didn't come down of itself."
The phosphorescence flashed in the swirl of the water all about his limbs, his other hand seized the ladder.
Felton mounted the ladder first, and gave his hand to Milady, while the sailors supported her, for the sea was still much agitated.
The mass swung clear of the ladder, the men still clinging to their escaping foe.
We heard the ladder creak again under a ponderous and slow descent; and we stood upright in the dim flicker of a candle-end that I had lit and left burning on the floor.
As he descended thus slowly, the ladder seemed interminable and the pit bottomless, yet he realized when at last he reached the bottom that he could not have descended more than fifty feet.
The ladder dropped close to him, and at the instant he grasped it the doctor again shouted to Kennedy:
'I beg your pardon, Sir?' returned Kit, looking down from the ladder.