Laestrygones

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Laestrygones

man-eating giants encountered by Odysseus. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
References in classic literature ?
Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reached the rocky stronghold of Lamus--Telepylus, the city of the Laestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep and goats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [to feed] and this last answers the salute.
But Antiphates raised a hue-and-cry after them, and thousands of sturdy Laestrygonians sprang up from every quarter--ogres, not men.
"The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which the people draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, till presently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetch water, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates.
"Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how they had been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savage ogre Polyphemus.
The Mykonos vase, discovered in 1961, offers the first depiction of the Trojan Horse, and some scholars think it was home to Odysseus's Laestrygonians.a race of vicious, ravenous cannibals.
But now it looks like the brave Odysseas has been crushed by the Laestrygonians of the political party system.
In the quotation from "Laestrygonians" highlighted by Nabokov for his students, Leopold Bloom offers to help a blind youngster--the sightless piano-tuner--in the street: Do you want to go to Molesworth street?
Fewer than 50 men were left by that point, the bulk having been harpooned by the Laestrygonians: see Newton (2009, 80-85).
According to Giesecke, the various beings that Odysseus encounters can be arranged on a scale from most human and civilized--the Phaiakians, the Laestrygonians, and the Aeolian--to the most despicable and natural: the Lotus Eaters, Circe, and the Cyclops.
46), and lightens the mood with bureaucratic Laestrygonians (p.
In "Laestrygonians" (the "digestive" chapter of Ulysses), for example, Bloom measures time in the form of microcosmic and macrocosmic peristalsis.
Such questions are worth asking because Thucydides refers to the (mythical/Odyssean) Cyclopes and Laestrygonians at the beginning of his story (6.2).