Lagrangian points

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Lagrangian points

(lă-grayn -jee-ăn) Five locations in space where a small body can maintain a stable orbit despite the gravitational influence of two much more massive bodies, orbiting about a common center of mass. They are named after the French mathematician J.L. Lagrange who first suggested their existence in 1772. A Lagrangian point 60° ahead of Jupiter in its orbit around the Sun, and another 60° behind Jupiter, are the average locations of members of the Trojan group of asteroids; these points are denoted L4 and L5. The three other Lagrangian points in the Sun–Jupiter gravitational field do not permit stable asteroid orbits owing to the perturbing influence of the other planets. In any system these three points lie on the line joining the centers of mass of the two massive bodies and are denoted L1 (the inner Lagrangian point) and L2 and L3 (the outer Lagrangian points); small bodies here would be in unstable equilibrium (see equipotential surfaces).

Lagrangian points

[lə′grän·jē·ən ‚poins]
(astronomy)
Five points in the orbital plane of two massive objects orbiting about a common center of gravity at which a third object of negligible mass can remain in equilibrium; three points of instable equilibrium are located on the line passing through the centers of mass of the two bodies, and two points of stable equilibrium are located in the orbit of the less massive body, 60° ahead of or behind it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key is to dispense with the Eulerian continuous number or mass density representation and instead apply a judiciously selected ensemble of Lagrangian point particles, called superdroplets or superparticles, to represent the formation, growth, and motion of cloud and precipitation particles.
Such objects typically remain gravitationally trapped for relatively short periods (1,000-100,000 years) and eventually switch to one or other Lagrangian point, or are even ejected altogether thereby losing their Trojan status.
This huge amount of data will be transmitted by the satellite from its orbit around the L2 Sun-Earth Lagrangian point at a distance of 1.5 million kilometers from the Earth, using its K-band radiofrequency data transmission system.
The final step will be to integrate the telescope onto the spacecraft and test the fully assembled observatory before it is launched to orbit the Sun at the L2 Lagrangian point, 1.5 million km from Earth.
Aditya-L1 mission is aimed at studying the Sun from an orbit around the Sun-Earth Lagrangian point 1 (L1) which is about 1.5 million kilometres from the Earth.
The PSLV launch comes just days after the release of the (http://indiabudget.nic.in/ub2017-18/eb/sbe91.pdf) Indian government's annual budget  that earmarked funds for an upcoming mission to Venus, a Mars orbiter mission, and the Aditya 1 mission, which seeks to place a spacecraft in the Lagrangian point L1 - a point of equilibrium that lies between Earth and the sun.
Gaia hovers at the [L.sub.2] Lagrangian point, a gravitational "neutral zone" about 1.5 million km (1 million miles) from Earth's nightside that moves with our planet as it orbits the Sun.
LISA Pathfinders destination is an orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrangian point L1.
Gaia will be launched later in 2013 on an Arianespace Soyuz rocket from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, and will map the stars from an orbit around the Sun, near a location some 1.5 million km beyond Earth's orbit known as the L2 Lagrangian point.
The craft will start its six-month scientific mission in early March, circling around the stable [L.sub.1] Lagrangian point between Earth and the Sun.
It arrived at what is called a Lagrangian point, where it will stay till the end of next year to conduct scientific observations and test deep space tracking and control capability for future possible explorations of Jupiter and the poles of the Sun.
The deputy designer of the Chang'e-2 satellite, Wang Xiaolei, said Chang'e-2 would travel 1.5 million kilometers away from the Earth's surface over the next 85 days, to reach what is called the Lagrangian Point.