Lahti

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Lahti

(lä`tē, läkh`–), city (1998 pop. 96,227), Southern Finland prov., S central Finland. Connected with the southern end of the Päijänne lake system, it is an important lake port as well as a transportation center. It has many large factories and is a center of the Finnish wood-products industry. Other industries include glassworks, breweries, and clothing factories. The city, founded in 1878, was incorporated in 1905. Many Karelians came to Lahti after the Finnish-Soviet armistice of 1944. The city hall (1912) was designed by Eliel SaarinenSaarinen, Eliel
, 1873–1950, Finnish-American architect and city planner, resident of the United States after 1923. In Finland, Saarinen's most celebrated building was the railway station in Helsinki.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lahti

 

a city and port in Finland, in Häme Province. Located on the south end of the Päiänne Lake system. Population, 88,700 (1970). Lahti is an important railroad junction. The city’s industry is represented by lumber processing and woodworking (sawn lumber, plywood, matches, and furniture) and the production of equipment for the pulp-and-paper industry; there are also textile, footwear, glass, and food-processing enterprises. Lahti is the site of Finland’s biggest radio station and a center of tourism and winter sport.

Present-day housing construction in Lahti is distinguished by diversity in the planning of neighborhood districts that blend organically with the landscape. Structures built in the 20th century include the city hall (1912, architect E. Saarinen), the concert hall (1957, architects K. and H. Siren), and a bank (1964, architect V. Revell). The Peace Monument was erected in Lahti in 1950–52 (granite, sculptor W. W. Aaltonen).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lahti

a town in S Finland: site of the main Finnish radio and television stations; furniture industry. Pop.: 98 253 (2003 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Most importantly though, the L-40 introduced the idea of real quantity manufacture to the Lahti concept: corners wer cut everywhere, particularly in the areas of polish (tool marks abound on L-40s), finish (the painstaking rust-blue applied by the Finns was scrapped in favor of a quick-to-apply, high-gloss hot blue), and--if one published source is to be believed--materials (the Swedish steel used was allegedly not so fine as the Finnish).
The Lahti, interestingly enough, remains in both Finnish and Swedish service to this day.
I should add here that, in terms of design rather than execution, I found either Lahti singularly disappointin.
In the first place, the Luger-like pitch of the Lahti grip, when combined with the grossly oversized Lahti frame, cramps the hand in such a way that the finger cannot gain proper purchase on the trigger.
In the second place, Lahti triggers are horrendous: they lend new meaning to the words "gritty" and "stagy." They can also be overweight, the test L-35 went six pounds, the L-40, seven.
Third, and to compound the practical accuracy problem still further, Lahti sights are far from optimum, even for service use.
Fifth, there is nowhere truly convenient to place the support hand on this gun, and with a muzzle-light arm like the Lahti, that support hand has lots of work to do.
Sixth, ammo sensitivity is marked in the Lahti, much as it is in the Luger, and for much the same reason.
The Lahti does, to be sure, work well enough and group well enough if you feed it proper ammunition.