Lamia

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Lamía

(lämē`ä, lā`mēə), city (1991 pop. 44,084), capital of Fthiótis prefecture, E central Greece. It is a transportation hub and an agricultural center. Founded about the 5th cent. B.C., it was the chief city of the small region of Malis and developed as an ally of Athens. It gave its name to the Lamian War (323–322 B.C.), waged by the confederate Greeks against Antipater, the Macedonian general, who took refuge in the city and was besieged there for several months. Antipater conquered (322 B.C.) the confederates at Crannon, near Larissa. Lamía was known as Zituni from the 10th to the 19th cent.

Lamia

(lā`mēə), in Greek mythology, grief-crazed woman whose name was used to frighten children. Her own children were killed by Hera, who was jealous of Zeus' love for her; thereafter Lamia, out of envy for happy mothers, stole and killed the children of others. In later legend, the name Lamia was also used for a woman who lured a youth to his destruction.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lamia

 

a city in central Greece, near the Gulf of Maliakos in the Aegean Sea, administrative center of the nome (department) of Phthiotis. Population, 37,800 (1971). The major activities are tobacco and cotton processing and the production of rugs. Lamia was founded in the fifth century B.C.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lamia

female spirit in serpent form; devours children. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 146; Br. Lit.: “Lamia” in Benét, 563]

Lamia

scaly, four-legged, hermaphrodite creature. [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 260–262]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the name Colonel Apolinar recalls Apollonius in the Lamian tale.
De cuando en cuando, si se la miraba con atencion, tenia imperceptibles gestos a ritmo con las cada vez mas amplias ondas de calor que lamian la espalda.
g., Hansen 1986: 36, who argues that Diodorus is correct, and Sekunda, who argues that at the beginning of the Lamian War there were only 21,000 citizens in all.
In the preface to the 1883 edition of the novel, Holmes tried to underplay his heroine's association with the Lamian serpent-woman, writing that his "poor heroine found her origin, not in fable or romance, but in a physiological conception fertilized by a theological dogma" (x).
The character called Kapo is actually Vilko Lamian, a baptized, uncircumcised Jew who is interned in Jasenovac but manages to survive Auschwitz by assuming the identity of a guard who dies while transporting prisoners.
Whether you want to know about the Forum Romanum or the Lamian War or the position of women or almost anything else, there's a lot to be said for beginning a quest for information here.
Once again the result was failure as the Athenians lost the Lamian War, and Demosthenes committed suicide.
Nicanor was outmatched by the experience and expertise of Polyperchon's general, Cleitus the White, naval victor in the Lamian War.