lamina cribrosa


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Related to lamina cribrosa: lamina cribrosa sclerae

lamina cribrosa

[′lam·ə·nə krə′brō·sə]
(anatomy)
The portion of the sclera which is perforated for the passage of the optic nerve.
The fascia covering the saphenous opening in the thigh.
The anterior or posterior perforated space of the brain.
The perforated plates of bone through which pass branches of the cochlear part of the vestibulocochlear nerve.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Peripapillary microvascular improvement and lamina cribrosa depth reduction after trabeculectomy in primary open-angle glaucoma.
* Infiltration posterior to lamina cribrosa, but not involving the cut end of Optic Nerve (Both also had less than 8 mm Optic Nerve length)--Two patients
Matsumoto et al., "Clinical factors associated with lamina cribrosa thickness in patients with glaucoma, as measured with swept source optical coherence tomography," PLoS One, vol.
Optic nerve at the level of the lamina cribrosa in an eye filled with silicone oil shows numerous clear spaces.
An intriguing finding of several studies is that intracranial pressure (ICP) is lower in patients with POAG and NTG [10-12], and a growing body of evidence indicates that glaucoma is a condition that develops from a mismatch in pressures across the lamina cribrosa. The optic nerve, a white matter tract of the central nervous system (CNS), is ensheathed in all three meningeal layers and surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the subarachnoid space (SAS) with a pressure equivalent to ICP [13].
Weinreb et al., "Three-dimensional evaluation of the lamina cribrosa using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in glaucoma," Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol.
It has been suggested that constriction of the lamina cribrosa pores in glaucoma act to compress the exiting CRV, causing a reduction in blood outflow from the retina and subsequently raise the pressure within the vessel.
Addicks, "Regional differences in the structure of the lamina cribrosa and their relation to glaucomatous optic nerve damage," JAMA Ophtalmology, vol.
High-risk features evaluated included the presence and extent of optic nerve (ON) invasion with respect to lamina cribrosa, the status of the ON cut margin, the presence of vitreous seedings, and invasion of the sclera, anterior chamber, and choroid.
(3) Due to the absence of connective tissue between the optic nerve fibers in the lamina cribrosa region and the absence of myelin sheathing around the nerve fibers, the optic nerve head is a relatively weak structure.