lamina

(redirected from Lamina papyracea)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

lamina

1. a thin plate or layer, esp of bone or mineral
2. Botany the flat blade of a leaf, petal, or thallus

lamina

[′lam·ə·nə]
(botany)
(anatomy)
A thin sheet or layer of tissue; a scalelike structure.
(geology)
A thin, clearly differentiated layer of sedimentary rock or sediment, usually less than 1 centimeter thick.
(materials)
A flat or curved arrangement of unidirectional or woven fibers in a matrix.

LAMINA

A concurrent object-oriented language.

["Experiments with a Knowledge-based System on a Multiprocessor", Third Intl Conf Supercomputing Proc, 1988].

["ELINT in LAMINA, Application of a Concurrent Object language", Delagi et al, KSL-88-3, Knowledge Sys Labs, Stanford U].
References in periodicals archive ?
Left medial blow-out fracture through the anterior lamina papyracea with no entrapment of the extraocular muscles.
High dosage (N = 165) Excellent Well Poor Not evaluable Maxillary sinus 79.6 15.5 4.9 0.0 (lateral wall) Uncinate process 66.9 18.8 13.4 0.9 Inferior turbinate 87.8 7.0 4.3 0.9 (os turbinale) Infraorbital nerve 54.5 32.4 12.7 0.3 canal Lamina papyracea 85.8 9.1 5.2 0.0 (infundibulum) Anterior ethmoidal 84.2 11.5 3.6 0.6 artery canal Lamina papyracea 95.2 1.8 3.0 0.0 (ant.
Normally, the uncinate is a sagittally-oriented structure with adequate space between it and bulla ethmoidalis, middle turbinate and lamina papyracea. The medial deflection may contact the middle turbinate or can narrow the middle meatus.
The uncinate process tip may fuse with the orbital floor or the inferior portion of the lamina papyracea, which is known as an atelectatic uncinate process.
Normally, the uncinate is a sagitally-oriented structure with adequate space between it and bulla ethmoidalis, middle turbinate and lamina papyracea. The medial deflection may contact the middle turbinate or can narrow the middle meatus.
(6) The boundaries of the frontal recess are typically formed by the agger nasi cell anteriorly; the lamina papyracea laterally; the most anterior and superior portion of the middle turbinate medially; and the ethmoid bulla, its associated bulla lamella, and the suprabullar cell (if present) posteriorly.
Seiberling et al described two complications that occurred when a trephine was placed into a frontal mucocele that had eroded the orbital rim and lamina papyracea. (6) After trephine flushing, one patient developed increased intraocular pressure and temporary proptosis, while the other developed brief asystole secondary to activation of the ocular carotid reflex.
The right lamina papyracea bowed laterally into the orbit.
It was also extending laterally into the orbit through the lamina papyracea. Incision was made on the overlying mucosa which was elevated exposing the mass in the nasal cavity.
The left lamina papyracea was thinned medially, with bowing of material into the inferior orbit.
[3,4,5] The erosion and destruction of the lamina papyracea provides the most common pathway for the contagious spread of sinus infection to the orbits.

Full browser ?