land ice


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land ice

[′land ‚īs]
(hydrology)
Any part of the earth's seasonal or perennial ice cover which has formed over land as the result, principally, of the freezing of precipitation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When it gradually disappears, it forms a vicious climate cycle in which dark ocean water starts to absorb more sunlight, thus heating up and lifting the overall global temperature, which, at the same time causes more land ice to melt.
Wouters, 2018: The land ice contribution to sea level during the satellite era.
Tonight, the first 45 fans at the entrance to the Sugar Land Ice and Sports Center were rewarded with free cowbellsblack ones with the Imperials' logo.
The causes of global sea level rise can be roughly split into three categories: (1) thermal expansion of sea water as it warms up, (2) melting of land ice and (3) changes in the amount of water stored on land.
Land ice is obviously a different story - its melting does add water to the oceans.
The new research found glaciers outside of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, repositories of 1 percent of all land ice, lost an average of 571 trillion pounds (259 trillion kilograms) of mass every year during the six-year study period, making the oceans rise 0.03 inches (0.7 mm) per year.
There are a number of reasons why sea levels are rising, but the primary explanation is that warmer temperatures are melting land ice and pushing more water into the ocean.
Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Manchester Metropolitan University and the Universite catholique de Louvain modelled sea-level changes over millennial timescales under a range of different emissions scenarios, taking into account all of the Earth's land ice and the warming of the oceans.
Land ice on Earth: a beginning of a global synthesis.
With the retreat of sea ice and land ice, new, previously inaccessible areas are being revealed allowing for exploration in areas for the first time."
(15) Mercer's warning seemed prescient when the Larsen ice shelf--which buttresses land ice on the Antarctic Peninsula to the north--began crumbling in 1995.