Landau damping


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Landau damping

[′lan‚dau̇ ‚dam·piŋ]
(plasma physics)
Damping of a plasma oscillation wave which occurs in situations where the particles of the plasma are able to increase their average energy at the expense of the wave, and thus to damp it out, even in cases where the dissipative effects of collisions are unimportant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This phenomenon is called Landau damping, which is described by Eq.
Individual topics include hydrodynamic limits of kinetic models, collisionless plasmas and the Vlasov Maxwell system, irreversible behaviors in Vlasov equation and many-body Hamiltonian dynamics in terms of Landau damping, chaos and granularity, guiding center theory, variational formulation of exact and reduced Vlasov-Maxwell equations, general gyrokinetic theory (including an article with applications in magnetic confinement research in plasma plastics) kinetic to fluid descriptions in plasmas, nonlocal closures in long mean free path regimes, modeling quantum plasmas and inelastic kinetic theory in terms of the granular gas.