Landes


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Landes

(läNd), region, SW France. It is a vast, flat, nearly triangular tract of sand and marshland, stretching along the Atlantic coast for more than 100 mi (160 km) between the Adour River and the Médoc region and reaching inland as far as 40 mi (60 km). It thus covers most of Landes dept. and part of Gironde dept. and converges on Nérac (Lot-et-Garonne). Formerly, sheep grazing was the only occupation in this insalubrious region, but much of the land has been reclaimed through drainage and the planting of pine forests. Agriculture is progressing and lumber and resins are important products. The chief towns are Mont-de-Marsan, Dax, and Arcachon, a popular resort.

Landes,

department (1990 pop. 313,100), SW France, in GasconyGascony
, Fr. Gascogne, region of SW France. It is now coextensive with the departments of Landes, Gers, and Hautes-Pyrénées and parts of Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Lot-et-Garonne, Tarn-et-Garonne, Haute-Garonne, Gironde, and Ariège.
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, on the Atlantic coast. Mont-de-Marsan is the capital.

Landes

 

a department in southwestern France, on the coast of the Bay of Biscay of the Alantic Ocean. Area, 9,400 sq km; population, 281,000 (1971). Administrative center, Mont-de-Marsan.

Much of Landes Department consists of a sandy plain called the Landes. In the south are the foothills of the Pyrenees, cut by tributaries of the Adour River. About two-thirds of the territory is covered with forest. The basis of the economy is forestry and a lumber industry. There are oil wells near Parentis-en-Born. In agriculture, corn and grapes are cultivated, and cattle, pigs, and sheep are bred (cheese is produced, including Roquefort). There is also an oyster industry. Resorts include Dax, Capreton, and Mimizan.

Landes

1. a department of SW France, in Aquitaine region. Capital: Mont-de-Marsan. Pop.: 341 254 (2003 est.). Area: 9364 sq. km (3652 sq. miles)
2. a region of SW France, on the Bay of Biscay: occupies most of the Landes department and parts of Gironde and Lot-et-Garonne; consists chiefly of the most extensive forest in France. Area: 14 000 sq. km (5400 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
A visit to Les Landes is something I can highly recommend.
Then the group "had the novel idea at the time of playing a whole set of Beatles songs," said Landes, who wasn't on board at the time.
Landes's casual reference to the builder of the Model T is characteristic of the author's tone.
Landes says balancing the sensitivity of tax accruals with the need for auditors to obtain evidence "puts us between the proverbial rock and a hard place." He adds that "investors, the PCAOB and the SEC are expecting us to do our job; we can only do that when we have access to sufficient appropriate evidence to support clients' assertions and to support our opinion.'"
Landes: Several years ago, the AICPA's board of directors and council approved increasing the ASB's membership to 19 from 15 to better represent our constituency, which includes small and large firms, educators, the state boards of accountancy, the government community, other federal and state regulators, private investors and other users of nonissuer financial statements, whose support the ASB needs to effectively serve private business and government entities.
Existing Landes journals include "Annexins," "Cancer Biology & Therapy," "Cell Cycle," "Organogenesis" and "RNA Biology." The company has plans to launch as many as 17 additional journals through the end of 2007, including such titles as "NanoMedicine," "Molecular Motors," "Tissue Regeneration" and "Digital Signalling & Processing in Medicine ' & Biology."
The store, which Landes said is unlike any other dollar store concepts, carries cell phone accessories, kitchen utensils, collectibles, picture frames and scented and gel candles.
Landes examines the expectations Ojibwa society placed on women and their responses to these, and how the norms of behavior for Ojibwa women were modified by life events such as illness or mistreatment.
Now that he is in his 70s, Landes's game must be slowing down, and one can picture him these days using an old man's guile, and winning with it.
After a brief but poignant "Introduction" (more on this later), Landes devotes a couple of chapters to the influence of geography on history.
My aim in writing this book," David Landes announces at the outset of this richly rewarding study, "is to do world history." As bold as that goal might be, the author's real ambition is larger still.
One cannot make the same criticism of David Landes' The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor.