Landmark

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landmark

[′lan‚märk]
(cell and molecular biology)
Any distinctive feature that can be used to identify a chromosome.
(engineering)
Any fixed natural or artificial monument or object used to designate a land boundary.
(navigation)
A conspicuous natural or artificial object near or on land, other than an established aid to navigation, and observable by eye or radar; used in the piloting type of navigation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Landmark

Any building structure or place that has a special character or special historic or aesthetic interest or value as part of the heritage or cultural characteristics of a city, state, or nation.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

landmark

1. Any building, structure, or place that has a special character, special historic interest, and/or special aesthetic interest, or value, as part of the development, heritage, or cultural characteristics of a nation, state, city, or town.
2. A monument, fixed object, or marker on the ground that designates the location of a land boundary.
3. A formal designation of such status for a building by a national or local authority. Also see National Historic Landmark and National Register of Historic Places.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While landmarked buildings' exteriors are most often subject to preservation guidelines, sometimes, the interiors require careful handling, too.
The pair brokered a record-breaking price for Unit C at 1372 Dean Street, a fortress-like landmarked building, dubbed "The Castle" for its impressive brick facade and three-story curved turret.
Converted landmarked building with interiors by Philippe Starck.
The Independent's claim that $43 million would be realized if the lands were sold was exaggerated, according to the statement, as it does not take into consideration buildings still in use that the archdiocese will not sell, as well as landmarked buildings or buildings for which the archdiocese is unable to get a demolition permit from the city.