Langmuir isotherm equation

Langmuir isotherm equation

[′laŋ‚myu̇r ′īs·ə‚thərm i‚kwā·zhən]
(physical chemistry)
An equation, useful chiefly for gaseous systems, for the amount of material adsorbed on a surface as a function of pressure, while the temperature is held constant, assuming that a single layer of molecules is adsorbed; it is ƒ = ap /(1 + ap), where ƒ is the fraction of surface covered, p is the pressure, and a is a constant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The best interpretation for the experimental data given by the Langmuir isotherm equation and maximum adsorption capacity of the sorbent under the optimal conditions was 198.25 mgg-1.
The linear form Langmuir isotherm equation can be represented by:
where [K.sub.L] is the equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm equation, T is the absolute solution temperature (K), and R is the ideal gas constant (8.314 J/mol/K).
The linear form of the Langmuir isotherm equation aids in the evaluation of the maximum adsorption capacity ([q.sub.max]) corresponding to monolayer coverage (or site saturation) and the Langmuir constant, [K.sub.L] of the adsorption process and is represented as:
The Langmuir isotherm equation (Equation 2) is the most widely used two-parameter equation and has been successfully applied to many adsorption processes (Liu and Zhang, 2009; Cao et al, 2009; Chen et al, 2011).
The equilibrium data conform to the Langmuir isotherm equation with the monolayer adsorption capacity of 112.5 mg/g and 91.07 mg/g for adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH, respectively.
Generally, Langmuir isotherm equation can be expressed as (2) [5, 10], which is mainly based on the monolayer adsorption on the active reaction sites of the adsorbent:
The sorption of Cu by the study soil was described by the Langmuir isotherm equation (McBride 1994):
A possible explanation is that the xylidine adsorption equilibrium follows the Freundlich isotherm while the Rice method uses the linear isotherm and the Thomas method uses the Langmuir isotherm equation. More precise numerical methods [e.g.
The Langmuir isotherm equation is represented by the following equation (Tsai et al.