Laniatores


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Laniatores

[‚lan·ē·ə′tȯr·ēz]
(invertebrate zoology)
A suborder of arachnids in the order Phalangida having flattened, often colorful bodies and found chiefly in tropical areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his catalogue of Brazilian Laniatores, Mello-Leitao (1923) reported the presence of an unsexed specimen of D.
The 2010 recipient of the Wilks Award was Shahan Derkarabetian, San Diego State University, for his paper entitled "Systematics of the Sclerobuninae (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores): cryptic species and troglomorphic evolution."
Los Laniatores fueron estudiados por Roewer (1927), quien anadio cuatro nuevas especies (Musola longipes, Selenca minuscula, Selenca filipes, Pyramidops albimana) y menciono otras siete mas.
The evolutionary and biogeographic history of the armoured harvestmen - Laniatores phylogeny based on ten molecular markers, with the description of two new families of Opiliones (Arachnida).
Robert Dowler, President-Elect, presented the Wilks Award to Shahan Derkarabetian, San Diego State University, Department of Biology, for his presented research: Systematics of the Sclerobuninae (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores): Cryptic Species and Troglomorphic Evolution.
This accounts for 10% of the valid Gonyleptidae and is caused by real diversity and also by generalized use of meristic formulas in Laniatores (the so-called Roewerian system), which has been widely favored by subsequent authors.
El ganador del aho 2010 del Premio Wilks fue Shahan Derkarabetian, San Diego State University, por su ponencia titulada "Sistematica del Sclerobuninae (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores): especies secreta y evolucion de troglomorphicos."
With more than 700 described species (Medrano & Kury 2016), the Cosmetidae Koch, 1839 represents the third largest family in the order Opiliones, and the second most diverse group in the suborder Laniatores and superfamily Gonyleptoidea (Sharma & Giribet 2011; Pinto-da-Rocha et al.
Studies in harvestmen have rapidly increased in the last decade, focusing mostly on the largest suborder, Laniatores, a group with approximately 30 families distributed worldwide (Kury 2013; Giribet & Sharma 2015).