Lansquenets

(redirected from Lansquenet)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lansquenets

 

German mercenary infantry in the 15th to 17th centuries that served with its own weapons.

The homeland of the lansquenets was Swabia (southern Germany), where the term (Landsknechte) was applied originally to mercenaries from one’s own country, in contrast to foreign mercenaries. In the 16th century the lansquenets began to be hired by other European states as well (France, Austria, German and Italian states, Spain, and others). They were hired for a fixed period (from three months to a year) by a person who had received a license from the monarch. A regiment of lansquenets consisted of ten to 16 colors (400 to 600 men each, including 50 harquebusiers; the rest were armed with long pikes, halberds, and swords), which were the lowest tactical administrative units. In combat the lansquenets moved in large masses in closed formation with one large rectangular column. They were exceptionally brutal, especially toward the civilian population, and carried out mass looting of occupied towns and villages. After the Thirty Years’ War of 1618–48, when the European states made the transition to standing armies, the lansquenets ceased to exist.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
PEACHES FOR MONSIEUR LE CUR[ETH] by Joanne Harris (Doubleday pounds 18.99) Harris takes the magicallygifted chocolatier Vianne Rocher and her two daughters back to Lansquenet, the village where it all began.
The French town of Lansquenet is a repressed, buttoned-up place until sexy Vianne (Juliette Binoche) blows into town and turns a dusty bakery into an elegant chocolate shop.
Set in France in the late 1950s, story opens in the fictional hamlet of Lansquenet, a medieval village unchanged for centuries.
It is set eight years on, during Ramadan, when the chocolate shop in the rural French village of Lansquenet is now a ruined building owned by incomer Ines Bencharki, her face hidden by a niqab (veil).
Peaches for Monsieur le Cure takes the reader back, once more, to the little French village of Lansquenet where the tale began.
Ever careful of public scrutiny - lest she reveal any hint of their bewitching gifts or the disaster that engulfed them in Lansquenet - Vianne is going by the name Yanne and Anouk is calling herself Annie.
Juliet Binoche is wonderful as the travelling Vianne who arrives in the small French God-fearing village of Lansquenet with her young daughter and sets up a chocolate shop during Lent.
The book's chocolate shop La Celeste Praline in the small French town of Lansquenet is the forum for secrets to be revealed, battles to be fought, ardour to blossom and, of course, chocolate to be eaten in generous healing doses.
It is set eight years on, when the deliciously sinful chocolate shop in the rural French village of Lansquenet is now a ruined building owned by a mysterious incomer Ines Bencharki, her face hidden by a niqab (a veil worn by Muslim women).
Set soon after the Second World War, Vianne Rocher (Juliette Binoche), arrives with her young daughter in the quiet French town Lansquenet. The first surprise for the residents is that Vianne is a single mother.
It's Lent 1959, and the good folk of Lansquenet are bracing themselves to give up life's little luxuries in the Lord's name.