Laodicea

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Laodicea

(lāōd'ĭsē`ə), name of several Greek cities of Asia and Asia Minor built by the Seleucids in the 3d cent. B.C. The most important, Laodicea ad Lycum, was N of Colossae near the present Denizli. On the trade route from the East, the city prospered, particularly under Rome. Extensive Roman ruins include theaters, an aqueduct, a gymnasium, and sarcophagi. Laodicea ad Mare, a seaport of Syria S of Antioch, flourished under the Romans. It is the modern Latakia.

Laodicea

 

the name of several cities founded during the Hellenistic period.

One of the best known was Laodicea ad Mare on the coast of Syria (modern-day Latakia). It was founded by Seleucus I, who ruled from about 312 to 280 B.C, and was a major center for commerce and handicrafts during Hellenistic and Roman times.

Another Laodicea (Laodicea ad Lycum) was situated on the Lycus River in Asia Minor. It is now Eskihisar, a ruined site near the city of Denizli in Turkey. Laodicea ad Lycum was founded by Antiochus II in the middle of the third century B.C. It was a commercial center and a center for wool production. It was plundered by the Seljuks in the 11th century and by the Turks at the end of the 13th century. In 1402 it was destroyed by the troops of Timur. Remains of two theaters, an aqueduct, and a gymnasium survive from ancient times.

Laodicea Combusta was in Lycaonia. It was founded by Seleucus I.

Laodicea ad Libanum, or Scabiosa, was situated on the Orontes River. It was founded by Seleucus I on the site of ancient Kadesh.

Laodicea

the ancient name of several Greek cities in W Asia, notably of Latakia