Laodicea

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Laodicea

(lāōd'ĭsē`ə), name of several Greek cities of Asia and Asia Minor built by the Seleucids in the 3d cent. B.C. The most important, Laodicea ad Lycum, was N of Colossae near the present Denizli. On the trade route from the East, the city prospered, particularly under Rome. Extensive Roman ruins include theaters, an aqueduct, a gymnasium, and sarcophagi. Laodicea ad Mare, a seaport of Syria S of Antioch, flourished under the Romans. It is the modern Latakia.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Laodicea

 

the name of several cities founded during the Hellenistic period.

One of the best known was Laodicea ad Mare on the coast of Syria (modern-day Latakia). It was founded by Seleucus I, who ruled from about 312 to 280 B.C, and was a major center for commerce and handicrafts during Hellenistic and Roman times.

Another Laodicea (Laodicea ad Lycum) was situated on the Lycus River in Asia Minor. It is now Eskihisar, a ruined site near the city of Denizli in Turkey. Laodicea ad Lycum was founded by Antiochus II in the middle of the third century B.C. It was a commercial center and a center for wool production. It was plundered by the Seljuks in the 11th century and by the Turks at the end of the 13th century. In 1402 it was destroyed by the troops of Timur. Remains of two theaters, an aqueduct, and a gymnasium survive from ancient times.

Laodicea Combusta was in Lycaonia. It was founded by Seleucus I.

Laodicea ad Libanum, or Scabiosa, was situated on the Orontes River. It was founded by Seleucus I on the site of ancient Kadesh.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Laodicea

the ancient name of several Greek cities in W Asia, notably of Latakia
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hellenistic city of Laodikeia was built by Antiochus II Theos of the Seleucid Empire in the name of his wife Laodice during the middle of the third century B.C.
Pamukkale and Denizli is a must see place with ancient cities of Hierapolis, Laodikeia and Tripolis, thermal springs and travertines.
Invasion was thus prevented, partly by these great fortified cities, and partly by leaving a large stretch of no-man's-land, dotted with forts and largely uninhabited, between the two southern-most cities, Apamea and Laodikeia, and Ptolemy's lands.