Laomedon


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Laomedon

(lāŏm`ĭdŏn), in Greek mythology, king of Troy. When Laomedon failed to pay Poseidon, Apollo, and King Aeacus for building the walls of Troy, Poseidon sent a sea monster to ravage the land. Total catastrophe could be averted only by the sacrifice of Laomedon's daughter, Hesione. Laomedon offered Hercules a pair of immortal horses if he would rescue his daughter. Hercules slew the sea monster and saved Hesione but Laomedon refused to give him the horses. In revenge, Hercules sacked Troy and killed Laomedon and all his sons except Priam, who became the new king of Troy.
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The scenes in the National Gallery are Apollo Killing the Cyclops, The Punishment of Midas by Apollo, Apollo and Daphne, The Transformation of Cyparissus (only the lower, larger portion), Mercury Stealing the Herds of Admetus Guarded by Apollo, Apollo Slaying the Nymph Coronus, and Apollo and Neptune with Laomedon. See Salerno, A Domenichino Serie at the National Gallery 200-04; Spear 1: 195-201.
Johnson's attempt to persuade his readers that Portia's line `Go, Hercules' alludes to the emblem of Hercules choosing between Virtue and Pleasure struggles against his own clumsy syntax and Shakespeare's text, where the imagery powerfully identifies Bassanio with the myth of Hercules saving Hesione from the Laomedon monster.
Apollodorus, The Library 2.5.9, the story of Laomedon's testing by Poseidon and Apollo, and 3.98.2, the story of the testing by Zeus of the fifty sons of the patriarch Lycaon.
`The first satrap of Syria was Laomedon of Mitylene, who derived his authority from Perdiccas and from Antipater, who succeeded the latter as guardian of the kings.
7.452-3 Poseidon complains to Zeus that the wall built by the Achaeans will make men forget the one built by Apollo and himself during their service to Laomedon: 'and men will forget the wall that I and Phoebus Apollo built with labour [Greek Text Omitted] for the hero Laomedon.' Again, the LSJ translation 'having contended with him' misses the point.(15) This becomes especially clear from Poseidon's words to Apollo in Il.
(In other versions he is said to be the son of Laomedon, the son of Ilus, or of others.) Because of his great beauty, he was carried off either by the gods or by Zeus, disguised as an eagle, or, according to a Cretan account, by Minos, to serve as Zeus's cupbearer.
He also rescued Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy, who was to have been sacrificed to Poseidon's sea-monster.
It was enmity against Priam 's father, Laomedon, who had refused to pay Poseidon and Apollo for building the walls of Troy, that made the god side with the Greeks in the Trojan War.
Hesitantly, Strabo speculates that the reason is that the Greeks fought a just war, whereas Heracles waged an unjust one--quoting Homer--"for the sack of Laomedon's horses" (Il.
His son Laomedon succeeded him as ruler of the city, and his grandson Priam was the last king of Ilion.
They are 'Troiae duo fata' (389), Hercules because he sacked the city after Laomedon had refused to pay him for his services in slaying a sea-monster(13) and Achilles because he killed Hector and thus precipitated the end of the Trojan War.