Laon


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Laon

(läN), commercial town (1990 pop. 28,670), capital of Aisne dept., N France. It has forges, a printing plant, and factories that make heating equipment and metal goods. Situated on a rocky height c.300 ft (90 km) above the plain, it was fortified as early as Roman times. Laon was an episcopal see from the 5th cent. until the French Revolution. During the Middle Ages it was torn by bitter struggles against the bishops by the burghers, who ultimately succeeded (12th cent.) in obtaining recognition of their charter. Notable monuments include the vast Church of Notre Dame, St. Martin Church (both: 12th–13th cent.), and an octagonal chapel of the Templars (12th cent.).

Laon

 

a city in northeastern France, near the Oise-Aisne Canal; administrative center of the department of Aisne. Population, 26,300 (1968).

Located in Laon are the famous early Gothic Cathedral of Notre Dame (about 1150–1215), the Church of St. Martin (mid-12th to 13th century), the Templars’ Chapel (mid-12th century), an episcopal palace (now the Palace of Justice, 12th to 15th centuries), remains of a hospital (13th century), and buildings of the former abbeys (18th century) of St. Jean (now a prefecture) and St. Martin (now a hospital). Remnants of 13th-century city fortifications have also been preserved.

During the war of 1813–14 between the sixth coalition of European powers and Napoleonic France, a battle took place at Laon on Feb. 25–26 (Mar. 9–10), 1814, between the Russo-Prussian Silesian army (about 100,000 men) under the command of Prussian general G. Blücher and Napoleon’s army (145,000 men). After being defeated at Craonne on February 23 (March 7), Blücher hastily pulled back to Laon, where in a two-day battle he repelled all attacks by the French, after which Napoleon retreated to Reims.

References in periodicals archive ?
The passage typically read during Advent--at Laon and elsewhere--begins "Vos inquam convenio, o Judaei" (You, I say, do I challenge, O Jews) (18) and is actually the eleventh through eighteenth sections of a much longer work.
Vos inquam was not the only sermon with anti-Jewish resonances that the Laon canons would have heard during Advent.
The Laon cathedral community read and heard these sermons in a way that harnessed the different rhetorical tones and made the performance of their Ordo Prophetarum an integral part of the liminal liturgical space between Advent and Christmastide.
The choice and ordering of these Advent sermons is not unique to Laon (even if the level of detail displayed in the Laon ordinal is unusual).
At the same time, two other readings from these two weeks illustrate an anagogical approach, for they take as their basis the foretelling of Christ's first coming--his birth--and proceed to foretell his Second Coming at the Apocalypse; as Thomas Talley observed, Advent is a complex time of year in that it is "a time of beginning that carries with it a strong note of eschatological expectation." (39) The gospel reading from Luke that the Laon ordinal supplies for the second Sunday of Advent describes the signs that will accompany the Second Coming:
In the first weeks of the season, the canons at Laon hear both Old Testament prophecies of Christ's coming and the New Testament forerunner of Christ (John the Baptist); that is, the historical and allegorical senses.
The Laon canons' meticulous arrangement of the readings in the schedule for the days leading up to Christmas ensures, whenever possible, that Legimus sanctum Moysen is heard the day before Vos inquam--itself heard the day before the Christmas Vigil--creating a rhetorical escalation leading up to the Christmas feast.
The Laon canons created an Ordo Prophetarum that allowed them to perform this same concise exegetical trajectory.
The prophets who appear in the Laon Ordo Prophetarum are those who appear in the Vos inquam sermon, with two exceptions: Zacharias is absent, and Balaam is added (see Table 2).
Which is why it is most possible that an even bigger God made Laon. He made him this way for a good reason.
Laon would have nodded his head and simply replied in the language of thought: How do you know I am he?
Or even a thought of no consequence besides the consequence of rhyme, a beautiful phrase, a pretty line wonderfully weaving into the fabric of Einstein's universe and hiding there, invisible just like Laon himself or herself or itself.