Lapidoth


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Lapidoth

(lăp`ĭdŏth), in the Bible, Deborah's husband.
References in periodicals archive ?
(15) Professor Lapidoth dissented on the ground that the 1906 Agreement should control, and that only the points proposed by Israel for the final pillar were intervisible with the neighboring pillar; she also supported Israel's proposed location of pillars at Ras el Naqb.
And I think that these are her titles, [that is why] it is said that Deborah was "a woman prophet and woman of torches" (eshet lapidoth).
(66.) See Lapidoth, supra note 64, at 670 (describing United Nations Security Council's reaction to Israeli proclamation).
Pursuant to the workover agreement, Lapidoth will mobilise its Franks 750 drilling rig to Zion's temporarily suspended Elijah number three well, which was temporarily suspended at a total depth of about 11,000 feet.
Lapidoth maintained that there is no formal, comprehensive international law pertaining to blockades.
The novel is divided between Deronda's attraction to Gwendolen Harleth, the society beauty who ultimately gets trapped into marriage with a loathsome upper-class sadist, Henleigh Grandcourt, and Deronda's affiliation with a group of London Jews, one of whom, Mirah Lapidoth, he has saved from suicide.
"And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at the time.
True, Deborah is employed in an unconventional job for a woman in those days, yet she is introduced as a woman, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth (4:4), who sits in one place dispensing judgment to the children of Israel who come up to seek her advice.
(157.) Moshe Hirsch, Conflicting Obligations in International Investment Law: Investment Tribunals' Perspective, in THE SHIFTING ALLOCATION OF AUTHORITY IN INTERNATIONAL LAW: CONSIDERING SOVEREIGNTY, SUPREMACY AND SUBSIDIARITY-ESSAYS IN HONOUR OF PROFESSOR RUTH LAPIDOTH 323, 324-25 (Tomer Broude & Yuval Shany eds., 2008).
So we've had Prof Ruth Lapidoth prostituting herself on 12 July by cherry picking the San Remo Manual to make it all seem right.
Not only unable to imagine the possibility that Daniel will be marrying the Jewish Mirah Lapidoth, but she has no sense that Daniel's relationship to Mirah and her brother is entangled with Daniel's identity as a Jew and with the long history of Jews as a diasporic people: "Her mind was fixed on his [Daniel's] coming to Diplow before the autumn was over; and she no more thought of the Lapidoths--the little Jewess and her brother-as likely to make a difference in her destiny, than of the fermenting political and social leaven which was making a difference in the history of the word" (Deronda 772).