La Porte

(redirected from Laporte)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

La Porte

(lə pôrt), city (1990 pop. 21,507), seat of La Porte co., NW Ind.; inc. 1835. It is a manufacturing center in fertile farmland on the edge of the Calumet industrial region. The city's products include machinery; plastic, paper, wood, rubber, and metal products; furniture; and chemicals. Seven lakes adjoin the city, which also has summer resort activities and tourism.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in classic literature ?
"It is time for the king to go to bed; call Laporte."
"Sire!" interposed Laporte, in order to turn the subject, "to whom does your majesty wish me to give the candle?"
"To any one, Laporte," the child said; and then added in a loud voice, "to any one except Mancini."
But Mazarin, notwithstanding this permission, instead of reading the letters, took the knife which the dying Buckingham had snatched out of the wound and sent by Laporte to the queen.
The other was that which Laporte had placed in the hands of the Duke of Buckingham, warning him that he was about to be assassinated; that communication had arrived too late.
Scarcely had he left her when the queen went into her son's room, and inquired from Laporte if the king was in bed.
Anne ascended the steps side of the bed and softly kissed the placid forehead of her son; then she retired as silently as she had come, merely saying to Laporte:
"Try, my dear Laporte, to make the king more courteous to Monsieur le Cardinal, to whom both he and I are under such important obligations."
I was induced to marry her about three years ago, although she had but very little dowry, because Monsieur Laporte, the queen's cloak bearer, is her godfather, and befriends her."
"From Monsieur Laporte. Did I not tell you that she was the goddaughter of Monsieur Laporte, the confidential man of the queen?
Still more, formerly I used to get Laporte, my valet de chambre, to read historical subjects to me, but he put a stop to these readings, and took away Laporte from me.
If my poor Laporte were here, he would tell you that I have slept in ragged sheets, through the holes of which my legs have passed; he would tell you that afterwards, when I asked for carriages, they brought me conveyances half-destroyed by the rats of the coach-houses; he would tell you that when I asked for my dinner, the servants went to the cardinal's kitchen to inquire if there were any dinner for the king.