Large Magellanic Cloud


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Large Magellanic Cloud:

see Magellanic CloudsMagellanic Clouds
, two dwarf galaxies located in the far southern sky and visible to the unaided eye; they are classified as irregular because they show no definite symmetry or nucleus.
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Large Magellanic Cloud

(maj-ĕ-lan -ik) (LMC; Nubecula Major) See Magellanic Clouds.

Large Magellanic Cloud

[′lärj ¦maj·ə¦lan·ik ′klau̇d]
(astronomy)
An irregular cloud of stars in the constellation Doradus; it is 160,000 light-years away and nearly 30,000 light-years in diameter. Abbreviated LMC. Also known as Nubecula Major.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud, NGC 4490 is several times larger than its companion galaxy.
Surprisingly, they found no cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with an age between 5 and 15 billion years....
According to their analysis, the central part of the neighboring galaxy, called the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), completes a rotation every 250 million years.
Crowther and collaborators examined massive stars in two clusters, one in the Milky Way and the other in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.
But before that happens, scientists have calculated that the Milky Way will first crash into the Large Magellanic Cloud, another one of its satellite galaxies.
The discovery, made in the gigantic star-forming region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Universe into the one we live in today.
A bright new star had erupted in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, 165,000 light-years distant.
An explosion of a massive star was detected in 1987 in our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, just 170,000 light-years away.
The longer arm of the False Cross points to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).
30 Doradus 016 is a refugee from the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.
A (https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/483/2/2185/5181341) recent study found that the Large Magellanic Cloud and our galaxy will collide much sooner in around 2.5 billion years from now. 
But because it's incredibly diffuse, Crater 2 is much fainter than those companions, 1/100 as luminous as Sagittarius and 1/10,000 as bright as the Large Magellanic Cloud. The result appears in the July 1st Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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