Larsen Ice Shelf

(redirected from Larsen B)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Larsen Ice Shelf

 

one of the largest ice shelves in Antarctica. The Larsen Ice Shelf forms the eastern ice bank of the Antarctic Peninsula for a distance of more than 800 km (between 64.5° and 72.5° S lat.). Its greatest width is about 200 km; its area is about 86,000 sq km. On the east it is blockaded year-round by the drifting ice of the Weddell Sea. The Argentine Teniente Matienzo scientific station has been in operation in the northern part of the Larsen Ice Shelf since 1961. The shelf was named in honor of its discoverer (1893), C. Larsen.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is also the concern that what remains of Larsen C will be susceptible to the same fate as Larsen B, that it will collapse almost entirely.
Our work has highlighted (https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms4707) significant similarities between the previous behaviour of Larsen B and current developments at Larsen C, and we have shown that stability may be compromised.
In 2002, a Rhode Island-sized hunk of the Larsen B ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula shattered into thousands of icebergs during the area's hottest summer on record (SN: 3/30/02, p.
One of the satellite's first observations following its launch on 1 March 2002 was of break-up of a main section of the Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica - when 3200 sq km of ice disintegrated within a few days due to mechanical instabilities of the ice masses triggered by climate warming.
The authors suggest that the recent disintegration of two large sections of the Larsen Ice Shelf, known as Larsen A and Larsen B, were the result not just of increased melting on the surface of the ice (which is thought to speed the formation of cracks), but also of accelerated loss from the shelf's base.
LAST MARCH, a Rhode Island-size ice chunk sheared off the northern portion of the Larsen B Ice Shelf, a massive plate of floating ice lining the eastern coast of the arm-shaped Antarctic Peninsula.
But it took only five weeks for two thirds of Larsen B to break into thousands of icebergs.
Larsen B collapsed in 2002 and floated away much like the Larsen C likely will.
In February 2002, 3,250 square kilometers of the Larsen B ice shelf splintered into thousands of icebergs (SN: 3/30/02, p.
The Antarctic Peninsula's Larsen B ice shelf retreated past its historical minimum in March 1998 when a 200 square kilometer block of ice collapsed into the sea.
Scientists have been keeping an eye on the growing rift in Larsen C for years after the collapse of the Larsen A ice shelf in 1995 and the break-up of the Larsen B shelf in 2002.
The Larsen B ice shelf--or rather, the 40 percent of it that's left--rims a small portion of the eastern coastline of the Antarctic Peninsula.