Las Campanas Observatory


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Las Campanas Observatory

(lahs kahm-pah -nahs) An observatory near La Serena, Chile, sited on Cerro Las Campanas, at an altitude of 2300 meters; the seeing at this site is exceptional. The Observatory is owned by the Carnegie Institution of Washington. The principal instruments are the 2.5-meter Irenee du Pont Telescope, which went into operation in 1977, and the 1-meter Swope Telescope, which was named for Henrietta Swope and became operational in 1971. Two lightweight 6.5-meter telescopes – the Magellan Telescopes – came into operation at the start of the 21st century. Magellan I, also called the Walter Baade Telescope, saw first light in 2000; Magellan II, otherwise known as the Landon Clay Telescope, began working as a science instrument in 2002.
References in periodicals archive ?
The images of the sky are taken at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.
Luques team examined ground-based data stretching back to 1998 from the European Southern Observatory and the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, the W.M.
The maps are the first major discovery to come out of the new southern operations of SDSS's Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) survey, which is being carried out on the Irenee du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.
Chile's Las Campanas Observatory already hosts the twin Magellan Telescopes, each bearing a 6.5-meter (21-foot) mirror.
EDT, the Swope Telescope--the oldest and smallest of a collection of four optical telescopes at the Carnegie Institute of Science's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile--detected a bright optical counterpart to the gamma-ray burst and gravitational-wave signals, in a galaxy called NGC 4993.
The images, captured over a period of 45 nights using the 6.5 meter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, reveal galaxies that existed when the universe was just 1.3 billion years old.
Both observations were done with the 1.3metre Warsaw Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile as part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE).
Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory, and the remaining stars (visible only from the southern hemisphere) with the Clay Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.
On 23 February 1987, Ian Shelton took a photograph the Large Magellanic Cloud at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.
Presentations were given by representatives from many of the leading automated surveys, including Carl Akerlof of the Robotic Transient Research Experiment (ROTSE) comprising a global network of instruments, and Katarzyna Malek of the 'Pi in the Sky Observatory' project located in Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.
By using Magellan I and II, the twin 6.5-meter telescopes now nearing completion at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, Marcy and Butler hope by 2003 to double the number of stars that their team monitors.
Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea also consists of two identical telescopes, and the Las Campanas Observatory is already home to the twin 6.5-m Magellan Telescopes.