Rococo style

(redirected from Late Baroque)

Rococo style

(1720–1790)
A style of architecture and decoration, primarily French in origin, representing the final phase of the Baroque. It was characterized by a profuse, semiabstract ornamentation of shell work and foliage. It was associated with lightness, swirling forms, flowing lines, ornate stucco work, arabesque ornament, and the blending of separate members into a single molded volume.
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Let's explore its amazing history and treasures!Discover Bronze and Stone Age artifacts, Celtic and Slavic settlements, the ruins of the Blatnica Castle from the 13th century, the museum of Karol Plicka, a famous photographer and ethnographer located in a Baroque-classicist manor house, a late Baroque manor house from the 18th century, traditional houses with arches, where producers of healing oils made from drug plants used to live.
The court of the art-loving Johann Adam Count of Questenberg (1678-1752) was important centre of late Baroque culture in Moravia.
The second part, "Beyond Italy: Dissemination of the Solo Italian Keyboard Sonata during the Late Baroque Period.
Designed in the late Baroque style of the 18th century, the Palazzo Poli is a palace in Rome, Italy, which forms the impressive backdrop to the famous Trevi Fountain.
The building has late baroque design features both inside and out, The faade has a pilaster structure and the interior is richly stuccoed.
However, he was a prolific and, in his own way, inventive composer in both the late Baroque and gallant styles.
Drawing entirely on literary sources, Kivist| investigates what constituted scholarly vices in the late Baroque and early Enlightenment periods.
Commonly known as Tumauini Church, the structure was built entirely of red bricks and done in the style of Late Baroque or Early Rococo.
The scene of her wading into the late baroque Trevi fountain in a strapless velvet black dress, calling to Mastroianni in English, "Marcello!
Franz Xaver Messerschmidt lived and worked in and across two stylistic eras, the late Baroque and the early Neo-Classical, yet the work he is most known for belongs to neither: 69 portrait busts known as The Character Heads.
The building in its present form was completed in the 1760s in a Rococo style, also known as Late Baroque (6).
Art is more often used to illustrate philosophical ideas than to form them; this highly original study looks at how the 18th-century philosopher Giambattista Vico arrived at a radical understanding of the nature of truth--that it is imaginatively constructed--via his appreciation of late baroque art.