Latin Wars

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Latin Wars

 

in antiquity wars fought by the Latins against Rome.

In 496 B.C. (according to classical tradition) the first Latin war began between Rome, which had been claiming hegemony in the Latin League, and the Latins. Soon after the legendary battle of Lake Regillus (496 B.C.) the Latin League was again resurrected (493 B.C.). The further strengthening of Rome after her victories of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. over the Aequi, Volscians, and Samnites led to an intensification of the contradictions between Rome and the other allies and brought about the second Latin war (340–338 B.C.), as a result of which the league was abolished. Cities closest to Rome were incorporated into the Roman state, with their inhabitants receiving civil rights but not the right to vote in the comitiae (what was called the Latin right). The lands of these cities were divided up among the Roman colonists, and their inhabitants were made clients. As allies of Rome there remained only the cities of Tibur, Praeneste, and Laurentum.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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An October 2014 conference in Amsterdam was the last of a series in which linguists and narratologists working with the classics joined forces to explore textual strategies in Greek and Latin war narrative.
Principal war: First Samnite War (343-341); Latin War (340-388).
Born about 383; Mus was a military tribune during the first Samnite War, and was reputed to have performed heroic deeds in that conflict; elected consul at the start of the Latin War (340); supposed to have vowed with his co-consul that the general whose troops wavered first would throw himself into the midst of the enemy, sacrificing himself to the gods (devotio), thus gaining heavenly favor for a Roman victory; killed performing such a sacrifice at the battle of Mount Vesuvius (near Naples) (340).
Speech and Thought in Latin War Narratives: Words of Warriors