latitudinarian

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latitudinarian

of or relating to a school of thought within the Church of England in the 17th century that minimized the importance of divine authority in matters of doctrine and stressed the importance of reason and personal judgment
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These views are typically Remonstrant or, as Mandeville thinks the clergy would consider him, "latitudinarian, if not worse." (21)
The anti-materialism of latitudinarian vehicularity, then, is one important strand of the sentimental tradition that persists over the long Romantic period.
Hampton's intention is not to overturn our traditional understanding of the later Stuart church as set out by John Spurr, Nicholas Tyacke, and others, a church split on ecclesiological understandings between the High Churchmen and the Latitudinarians but presumably not over fundamental theological issues.
Royal Society members included Latitudinarians keen to gain royal patronage by separating themselves from their former support of the revolutionary regime, and the charge that science was atheistic, and puritan enthusiasm.
Nicholas von Maltzahn has convincingly established Marvell's loyalty to the liberal Anglican theology espoused by his father, a broad-minded Church of England minister, while Keith Stavely's notes to Milton's final treatise, Of True Religion (1673), reveal his similar support for the liberal church comprehension proposals of the Latitudinarians, the most vocal exponents of a similar theology.
Bush, but for Anglican latitudinarians like Hogarth's friends it represented "enthusiasm" and a fanaticism, the opposite and the enemy of ordered and orderly religion.
History, it is plain, is not his subject: one has only to read his constant reference even to latitudinarians as "ultra-Protestants" or his "howler" than Pius IX was literally imprisoned in the Vatican to see that.
On the one hand, the Latitudinarians, who were in a minority amongst the clergy of the Church of England but had gained an ascendancy on the episcopal bench during the reign of William and Mary, were noted for the latitude with which they approached matters of doctrine and worship, and had long been sympathetic towards the Dissenters.
"Admittedly," Mayhew notes, "the progress from nature to faith is a more purely aesthetic one in Radcliffe than it had been in the early latitudinarians" (606), and in some sense this observation might be taken as a starting point for the present essay.
Then again, Latitudinarians in the 17th century insisted that faith and reason were not contradictory; indeed reason was seen as an essential element of religious thought, a means for confirming the truth of revelation.
He leads the extreme right wing of the orthodox party in the Established Church, and is the uncompromising opponent of all rationalists and semi-rationalists, all latitudinarians and liberals.
From the July 2002 Socinianism and Cultural Exchange symposium, held in Munich, 11 papers highlight the relationship of anti- Trinitarianism to liberal currents in reformed Protestantism, namely Dutch Remonstrants, some of the French Huguenots, and English Latitudinarians. Their topics include Nicolas Barnaud (1539-1604) between alchemy and antitrinitarianism, pluralization and authority in Grotius' early works, the Socinian objections of Hans Ludwig Wolzogen and Descartes, and some roots and ramifications of the Trinitarian controversy in 17th-century England.