Laughton


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Laughton

Charles. 1899--1962, US actor, born in England: noted esp for his films of the 1930s, such as The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), for which he won an Oscar, and Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
References in periodicals archive ?
CHALLENGE: Neil Laughton, left, and David Fox-Pitt at John O'Groats after completing their marathon from Land's End, on penny farthings
Laughton said that as of the beginning of October, Schwab Charitable donors had recommended upward of $12 million in grants for hurricane and earthquake relief, and this number continued to grow.
Laughton added: "The next step would may be the Prix Morny, or there's the Richmond at Goodwood in two weeks."
Laughton, now of Suggitt Street, Hartlepool, initially denied wrongdoing.
He wrote: "It was on the morning of June 25, 1940, when Laughton Goodwin heard the Post Office messenger whistling as he cycled up the drive of Palmers Hill.
"He opened the envelope and in stark capital letters the message read, 'Regret to inform that your son No 90504 PO BL Goodwin killed in flying accident.' .' "Laughton and his wife Jessie hugged each other in their grief and cried, and cried, and cried.
Charles Laughton will be remembered as the Hunchback of Notre Dame in the film of the same name, and his wife Elsa Lanchester, with black and white electric-shocked hair, as the Bride Of Frankenstein.
Before being rescued Laughton tweeted a picture, writing: "Not ideal kayaking conditions!" Coastguard Andrew Jarolimek said the men were well-prepared for the trip but the ice worked against them.
In addition to the Laughton Prospect, PEDL209 also has two further leads all of which are similar dip and fault closed structures.
Laughton has over 25 years' experience in the engagement marketing, brand development, advertising and communications field.
That changed quickly in the same year, 1938, when she was cast in Alfred Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn opposite Charles Laughton. By that time she had mastered the elevated British stage diction that she employed, with variations for the rest of her career.