Lancelot

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Lancelot

(lăn`sələt, –lŏt) or

Ladislaus

(lăd`ĭslôs, –ləs), c.1376–1414, king of Naples (1386–1414), son and successor of Charles III. Almost his entire reign was consumed by his struggle with the AngevinAngevin
[Fr.,=of Anjou], name of two medieval dynasties originating in France. The first ruled over parts of France and over Jerusalem and England; the second ruled over parts of France and over Naples, Hungary, and Poland, with a claim to Jerusalem.
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 rival king of Naples, Louis IILouis II,
1377–1417, king of Naples (1384–1417), duke of Anjou, count of Provence, son and successor of Louis I of Naples. In 1389 the antipope Clement VII (Robert of Geneva) invested him with the kingdom, Lancelot, rival claimant of Naples, having been expelled in
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, and with Louis's ally, the antipope John XXIII (see Cossa, BaldassareCossa, Baldassare
, c.1370–1419, Neapolitan churchman, antipope (1410–15; see Schism, Great) with the name John XXIII. He had a military career before entering the service of the church.
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). Fortunes shifted repeatedly, but at his death Lancelot was able to transfer his kingdom to his sister, Joanna II. Lancelot occupied Rome several times and in 1413 ordered it sacked.

Lancelot

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Lancelot, asteroid 2,041 (the 2,041st asteroid to be discovered, on September 24, 1960), is approximately 19 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.6 years. Lancelot was named after the knight of the Round Table. According to J. Lee Lehman, this asteroid “represents glory thrust on the individual, not due to any personal qualities or actions, but simply from being in the right place at the right time.” Schwartz gives Lancelot’s associations as “heroic actions resulting from good fortune rather than effort.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Lancelot

enters into an adulterous relationship with Guinevere. [Br. Lit.: Malory Le Mort d’Arthur]
References in periodicals archive ?
There are other ways in which Sir Launcelot Greaves wears its serial origins on its sleeve.
1-2 (Spring/Summer 1971):103-104; "Sir Launcelot and Queen Guinevere," ll.
The "author" of this narrative within a narrative is the apocryphal Sir Launcelot Canning.
In 1933, Sir Launcelot unveiled the first plans for his dream town, which would accommodate around 20,000 people.
Although Launcelot "dread him sore," the thirty knights "scattered on every side of him, and gave him the way, and therewith he waxed all bold, and entered into the chapel, and he saw no light but a dim lamp burning, and then was he ware of a corpse hylled with a cloth of silk" (174).
Therefore, sir launcelot, wyte thou well I am sette in suche a plyght to gete my soule hele.
Algernon Swinburne famously accused "the Morte d'Albert, or Idylls of the Prince Consort" of sullying the "Arthurian story, by reducing Arthur to the level of a wittol, Guenevere to the level of a woman of intrigue, and Launcelot to the level of a 'corespondent'" (Tennyson: Critical Heritage, p.
He also appeared as Launcelot Gobbo in Michael Radford's 2004 film adaptation of The Merchant of Venice.
An example of such an oath may be found at the end of The quest of the Holy Grail, when Launcelot and sir Bors are pledged to friendship and mutual company for the rest of their lives:
Darren Tunstall provides some comic relief as Launcelot Gobbo, who had the audience in stitches with his dilemma between the devil and his conscience.
Most of the episodes in Malory's 'Tale of Sir Launcelot du Lake', the third tale in his Morte Darthur, are based on the 'Agravain' section of the Old French Prose Lancelot,(1) but its Chapel Perilous episode derives from the corresponding episode in the Old French Perlesvaus.
Mentz's essay on Launcelot Gobbo's transactional economics in The Merchant of Venice).