Laurel Forests

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Laurel Forests

 

subtropical evergreen forests, formed of various species of sclerophyll trees and shrubs. They are distributed in regions with a Mediterranean climate (rainy winters and dry summers), predominantly in the lower mountain belt of the Mediterranean region, on the Canary Islands, on Madeira Island, and in the Cape Mountains; some small laurel forests are found in Western Transcaucasia. Laurel forests have been in existence since the Neocene. The Canary laurel, the avocado Persea indica, Ocotea foetens, Ocotea bulbata (with a short, bulbous trunk), the Canary strawberry tree, tree heath (which grows to 20 m), and English holly predominate in the laurel forests of the Canary and Azores Islands. Laurel forests consisting only of various species of Laurus, with large, leathery leaves, are very shady (between one-twentieth and one-fortieth of daylight penetrates their canopy); in these forests are found rare shade-tolerant plants, including Ruscus and cyclamens.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There, it grows as an understorey plant in the laurel forests so is happily adapted to shade and dry conditions.
The islands contain unique ecosystems particular to these volcanic regions, and many of them -- including coastal lagoons and laurel forests -- are under threat.
"Laurel forests in Tenerife, Canary Islands: the annual course of sap flow in Laurus trees and stands." Journal of Hidrology, 183: 307-321.
"Water relations of Canarian laurel forest trees." In: Water transport in plants under climatic stress.
Here the Menceys still rule among the ancient laurel forests which sweep down to the coast.