Laurentide ice sheet


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Laurentide ice sheet

[lȯr·ən‚tīd ′īs ‚shēt]
(hydrology)
A major recurring glacier that at its maximum completely covered North America east of the Rockies from the Arctic Ocean to a line passing through the vicinity of New York, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Kansas City, and the Dakotas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Events leading up to the sharp climate-cooling period known as the Younger Dryas, or more familiarly as the "Big Freeze," unfolded after glacial Lake Agassiz, at the southern edge of the Laurentide ice sheet covering Hudson Bay and much of the Canadian Arctic, catastrophically broke through an ice dam and rapidly dumped thousands of cubic kilometers of fresh water into the ocean.
1989, Routing of meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the Younger Dryas cold episode: Nature, v.
The recovery location and probable habitat place this large animal within 100-200 km of the southern terminus of the Laurentide ice sheet as mapped by Gallagher et al.
By the end of this time window, the margin of the Laurentide ice sheet, although highly lobate and irregular, lay across the Upper Peninsula.
Numerous studies have suggested that the lake disappeared about 8,400 years ago, when the center of the Laurentide Ice Sheet collapsed into Hudson Bay, allowing the lake to drain into the ocean.
Freshwater was driven into these basin margins during Pleistocene glaciation when pressure from the Laurentide ice sheet drove dilute waters deep underground.
At the time, most of North America down to what is now the northern tier of the United States lay beneath a massive but melting blanket of ice, known as the Laurentide ice sheet.
Turns out, most are related to a population of hardy chipmunks that once lived next to a towering block of ice called the Laurentide ice sheet.
Early on reconstructions of the Laurentide Ice Sheet retreat pattern in Labrador-Ungava were to a large extent based on the spatial pattern of glacial meltwater traces (e.
At the end of the Late Wisconsinan glacial epoch, fluctuations in the Lake Michigan Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet resulted in the formation of three moraine systems around the south end of the Lake Michigan basin: in decreasing age, the Valparaiso, Tinley and Lake Border ridges.
Flooding land to make the James Bay power reservoirs unquestionably kills a tiny percentage of the plants and animals of subarctic Quebec; the Laurentide ice sheet once killed 100 percent of the surface creatures that lived there," says Easterbrook.
In very strong terms, the group as a whole argues that the Laurentide ice sheet and the orbital changes from the last ice age to the present caused most of the climatic changes throughout the globe.