Norstad, Lauris

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Norstad, Lauris

(1907–88) aviator; born in Minneapolis, Minn. Commissioned into the cavalry after graduation from West Point in 1930, he transferred to the Air Corps the following year, and by August 1942 had risen to the post of deputy chief of staff of the 12th Air Force in North Africa. Returning to Washington in 1944, he had direct responsibility for planning the atomic bomb missions. He later commanded U.S. air forces in Europe (1950) and NATO forces in Europe (1956). He retired in 1963 to become president of Owens-Corning Glass.
References in periodicals archive ?
On page 93, Styles talks about Tibbets' well-known problems with Lauris Norstad in North Africa in 1943 and says, "Doolittle ...
Other members of the commission, including retired Generals Alfred Gruenther and Lauris Norstad, had greater reservations about the intrusion of market principles into military life.
Air Force General Lauris Norstad held a press conference in Ottawa publicly condemning Dief for his anti-nuclear policies.
Lauris Norstad was a major Air Force leader during the defining years of the Gold War, and except for Dwight Eisenhower, he was the most prominent of all the Supreme Allied Commanders Europe (SACEUR) since that position was established in early 1951.
Lauris Norstad, the former commander of NATO and then C.E.O.
Lauris Norstad, he was also the principal author of the National Security Act of 1947.
Lauris Norstad. Wolk argues that Norstad--who is largely forgotten today, despite his leadership of NATO and a recent (2000) biography--was a key element in eventual independence and in mitigation of Navy reluctance towards that independence through his work with Vice Admiral FolTest Sherman.
Several USAF generals also arrived, including Lauris Norstad, Curtis LeMay, and Leon Johnson, Commander 3d Air Division (later redesignated Third Air Force and situated in the London suburbs.)
Cabell, and Lauris Norstad. Formed by Arnold in March 1942, these carefully chosen officers had no specified long-term assignments; they were Arnold's idea men.
Lauris Norstad to help craft legislation for the National Security Act of 1947.
These papers clearly show that Mason Patrick, Hap Arnold, Dwight Eisenhower, Lauris Norstad, and George Marshall were the real architects of today's Air Force, often operating quietly--but effectively--in the Washington bureaucracy.