Euramerica

(redirected from Laurussia)

Euramerica

[‚yür·ə′mer·ə·kə]
(geology)
The continent that was composed of Europe and North America during most of the Mesozoic Era.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data on the magnetic susceptibility and natural gamma radiation of sediments (in cooperation with IGCP 580) will be used as auxiliary means for high-resolution correlation of biostratigraphic well-documented units belonging to different bathymetric sequences within the tropical belt (Laurussia, Siberia, peri-Gondwana and N- Gondwana).
belgicus (Leriche), 1931) which are found in Laurussia (USA, Canada, Belgium, Poland) and Gondwana (Morocco).
Its cause is taken to be the collision of Gondwana and Laurussia (Chlupac et al., 2002).
As the Baltic Devonian sedimentary basin was located in the northwestern part of the East European Craton, it lay in the equatorial region of the Laurussia continent that formed at the end of the Silurian (Ziegler 1988).
typical for the Famennian palaeotetrapod communities of Laurussia in the Khovanshchinian deposits of the Gorbachevo quarry in the west of the Tula Region (Fig.
They are known from the Early--Late Devonian (from Pragian to Frasnian stages), primarily of Laurussia (Halstead Tarlo 1967a; Halstead 1987) and, to a lesser extent, of the peri-Gondwanan shelf, Armorica, Barentsian, Kara-Tajmyr and Siberian palaeocontinents (Bystrow 1959; Blieck et al.
The new large supercontinent, which resulted from this collision and existed during Early Devonian times, is sometimes called Laurussia or Euramerica or the 'Old Red Continent' (Golonka 2007; Golonka & Gaw^da 2012).
Most records are documented from different parts of Laurussia, including its Laurentian part (e.g., Saltzman 2001; Brand et al.
The Palaeozoic geography of Laurentia and western Laurussia: a stable craton with mobile margins.
During the Early Devonian, the Holy Cross Mountains area was positioned at the southern shelf of Laurussia. Palaeontological data for this time in the Holy Cross Mountains are mainly represented by the body fossils and ichnofossils of invertebrates (Szulczewski & Por^bski 2008), as well as vertebrates (e.g., Kulczycki 1960; Tarlo 1964; Szrek et al.